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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:谢平元 大小:c5lsoxda66108KB 下载:IF2hx4FW19790次
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日期:2020-08-05 04:42:25
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  But, among all the rest by him thus warily noted, he most observedtwo Painters, of whom we have heeretofore twice discoursed, Brunoand Buffalmaco, who walked continually together, and were his neeredwelling neighbors. The matter which most of al he noted in them, was;that they lived merrily, and with much lesse care, then any else inthe Cittie beside, and verily they did so in deede. Wherefore, hedemanded of divers persons, who had good understanding of them both,of what estate and condition they were. And hearing by every one, thatthey were but poore men and Painters: he greatly mervailed, how itcould be possible for them, that they should live so jocondly, andin such poverty. It was related to him further beside, that theywere men of a quicke and ingenious apprehension, whereby heepolitikely imagined, that theyr poore condition could not so wellmaintaine them; without some courses else, albeit not publiquelyknowne unto men, yet redounding to their great commoditie and profite.In which regard, he grew exceeding desirous, by what meanes he mightbecome acquainted, and grow into familiarity with them both, or any ofthem, at the least: wherein (at the length) he prevailed, and Brunoproved to be the man.
2.  Sister (quoth she) if I were faithfully assured of thy secrecie, Iwould tell thee a thing which I have often thought on, and it may(perhaps) redound to thy profit. Sister, replyed the other Nun, speakeyour minde boldly, and beleeve it (on my Maidenhead) that I will neverreveale it to any creature living. Encouraged by this solemne answere,the first Nun thus prosecuted her former purpose, saying. I know notSister, whether it hath entred into thine understanding or no,strictly we are here kept and attended, never any man daring toadventure among us, except our good and bonest Fac-totum, who isvery aged; and this dumbe fellow, maimed, and made imperfect bynature, and therefore not worthy the title of a man. Ah Sister, ithath oftentimes bin told me, by Gentlewomen comming hither to visiteus, that all other sweetes in the world, are mockeries, to theincomparable pleasures of man and woman, of which we are barred by ourunkind parents, binding us to perpetuall chastity, which they werenever able to observe themselves.
3.  Our King (most Noble and vertuous Ladies) hath this day given us asubject, very rough and stearne to discourse on, and so much therather, if we consider, that we are come hither to be merry andpleasant, where sad Tragicall reports are no way suteable, especially,by reviving the teares of others, to bedew our owne cheekes withall.Nor can any such argument be spoken of, without moving compassion bothin the reporters, and hearers. But (perhaps) it was his Highnessepleasure, to moderate the delights which we have already had. Orwhatsoever else hath provoked him thereto, seeing it is not lawfullfor me, to alter or contradict his appointment; I will recount anaccident very pittifull, or rather most unfortinate, and well worthyto be graced with bur teares.
4.  Chynon being now wounded to the heart (where never any civillinstruction could before get entrance) with loves piercing dart, bythe bright beauty of Iphigenia, mooved much admiration (falling fromone change to another) in his Father, Kindred, and all else thatknew him. For first, he requested of his Father, that he might behabited and respected like to his other Brethren, whereto right gladlyhe condiscended. And frequenting the company of civill youths,observing also the cariage of Gentlemen, especially such as wereamorously enclined: he grew to a beginning in short time (to thewonder of every one) not onely to understand the first instructionof letters, but also became most skilfull, even amongst them that werebest exercised in Philosophy. And afterward, love to Iphigenia beingthe sole occasion of this happy alteration, not onely did his harshand clownish voyce convert it selfe more mildely, but also heebecame a singular Musitian, and could perfectly play on anyinstrument. Beside, he tooke delight in the riding and managing ofgreat horses, and finding himselfe of a strong and able body, heexercised all kinds of Military Disciplines, as well by Sea, as on theland. And, to be breefe, because I would not seeme tedious in therepetition of all his vertues, scarsly had he attained to the fourthyeare, after he was thus falne in love, but hee became generallyknowne, to be the most civil, wise, and worthy Gentleman, aswell forall vertues enriching the minde, as any whatsoever to beautifie thebody, that very hardly he could be equalled throughout the wholekingdome of Cyprus.What shall we say then (vertuous Ladies) concerning this Chynon?Surely nothing else, but that those high and divine vertues, infusedinto his gentle soule, were by envious Fortune bound and shut up insome small angle of his intellect, which being shaken and set atliberty by love, (as having a farre more potent power then Fortune, inquickning and reviving the dull drowsie spirits) declared his mightyand soveraigne Authority, in setting free so many faire and preciousvertues unjustly detayned, to let the worlds eye behold them truly, bymanifest testimony from whence he can deliver those spiritssubjected to his power, and guid them (afterward) to the highestdegrees of honour. And although Chynon by affecting Iphigenia,failed in some particular things; yet notwithstanding, his FatherAristippus duely considering, that love had made him a man, whereas(before) he was no better then a beast: not onely endured allpatiently, but also advised him therein, to take such courses asbest liked himselfe. Neverthelesse, Chynon (who refused to be calledGalesus, which was his naturall name indeed) remembring that Iphigeniatearmed him Chynon, and coveting (under this title) to accomplishthe issue of his honest amorous desire: made many motions toCiphaeus the Father of Iphigenia, that he would be pleased to lethim enjoy her in marriage. But Ciphaeus told him, that he hadalready passed his promise for her, to a Gentleman of Rhodes, namedPasimondo, which promise he religiously intended to performe.
5.  When Ricciardo saw the Father and Mother both there present, hecould not devise what to do or say, his senses became so strangelyconfounded; yet knowing how hainously he had offended, if thestrictnesse of Law should bee challenged against him, falling on hisknees, he saide. Alas Messer Lizio, I humbly crave your mercy,confessing my selfe well worthy of death, that knowing the sharperigour of the Law, I would presume so audaciously to breake it. Butpardon me worthy Sir, my loyall and unfeigned love to your DaughterCatharina, hath bene the only cause of my transgressing.
6.  I make no doubt, but you have often heard report, of king Charls theAged, and first of that name, by reason of his magnificententerprises, as also his most glorious victory, which he obtaindagainst King Manfred, when the Ghibellines were expulsed foorth ofFlorence, and the Guelphes returned thither againe. By which occasion,an ancient knight, named Signior Neri degli Uberti; forsaking then theCity, with all his family and great store of wealth, woulde live underany other obedience, then the awful power or command of KingCharles. And coveting to be in some solitary place, where he mightfinish the remainder of his dayes in peace, he went to Castello daMare; where, about a Bow shoote distance from all other dwellinghouses, hee bought a parcel of ground, plentifully stored with varietyof Trees, bearing Olives, Chesnuts, Orenges, Lemons, Pomcitrons, andother excellent frutages, wherewith the Countrey flourishethabundantly. There he built a very faire and commodious house, andplanted (close by it) a pleasant Garden, in the middst whereof,because he had great plenty of water: according as other men use todo, being in the like case so wel provided; he made a very goodlyPond, which forthwith had all kinde of Fish swimming in it, it beinghis daily care and endevour, to tend his Garden, and encrease hisFish-pond.

计划指导

1.  But honourable Sir Roger, perceiving what delight his Children tookein the poore mans company; albeit he was offended at his Fathers harshwords, by holding his wife in such base respect: yet favoured thepoore Count so much the more, and seeing him weepe, did greatlycompassionate his case, saying to the poore man, that if he wouldaccept of his service, he willingly would entertaine him. Wheretothe Count replyed, that very gladly he would embrace his kindeoffer: but he was capeable of no other service, save onely to be anhorsekeeper, wherein he had imployed the most part of his time.Heereupon, more for pleasure and pitty then any necessity of hisservice, he was appointed to the keeping of an Horse, which wasonely for his Daughters saddle, and daily after he had done hisdiligence about the Horse, he did nothing else but play with thechildren. While Fortune pleased thus to dally with the poore CountD'Angiers, and his children, it came to passe, that the King of France(after divers leagues of truces passed betweene him and the Germaines)died, and next after him, his Son the Dolphin was crowned King, and itwas his wife that wrongfully caused the Counts banishment. Afterexpiration of the last league with the Germains, the warres began togrow much more fierce and sharpe, and the King of England, (uponrequest made to him by his new brother of France) sent him veryhonourable supplies of his people, under the conduct of Perotto, hislately elected President of Wales, and Sir Roger Mandevile, Son to hisother Lord high Marshall; with whom also the poore Count went, andcontinued a long while in the Campe as a common Souldier, where yetlike a valiant Gentleman (as indeed he was no lesse) both in adviceand actions; he accomplished many more notable matters, then wasexpected to come from him.
2.  My thoughts did speake, for thoughts be alwayes free,
3.  Never more shall thy falshoode me enfolde.
4.  Heere you are to understand (Gracious Ladies) that according tothe season of the yeare, a great snow had falne the day before, soas the whole Court was covered therewith, and being an extreamefrost upon it, our Scholler could not boast of any warme walking, whenthe teeth quivered in his head with cold, as a Dog could not be morediscourteously used: yet hope of enjoying Loves recompence atlength, made him to support all this injury with admirable patience.
5.  When the Bishop had heard all the discourse, highly he commended thewisedome of the Gentlewoman, and worthy assistance of her brethren,who contemning to soile their hands in the blood of a Priest, rathersought to shame him as hee deserved. The Bishop enjoyned him apennance of repentance for forty dayes after, but love and disdainemade him weepe nine and forty: Moreover, it was a long while after,before he durst be seene abroad. But when he came to walke thestreets, the Boyes would point their fingers at him, saying. Beholdthe Provoste that lay with Ciutazza: Which was such a wearisome lifeto him, that he became (well neere) distracted in his wits. In thismanner the honest Gentlewoman discharged her dutie, and rid herselfe of the Provosts importunity: Ciutazza had a merry night of it,and a new Smocke also for her labour.
6.  And so consider of my miseries,

推荐功能

1.  The young Gentleman, is the Sonne to Landolfo di Procida, theonely Brother to Lord John di Procida, by whose meanes thou becamestLord and King of this Countrey. The faire young Damosell, is theDaughter to Marino Bulgaro, whose power extendeth so farre, as topreserve thy prerogative in Ischia, which (but for him) had long sincebene out-rooted there. Beside, these two maine motives, to challengejustly grace and favour from thee; they are in the floure and pride oftheir youth, having long continued in loyall love together, andcompelled by fervency of endeared affection, not any will to displeasethy Majesty: they have offended (if it may be termed an offence tolove, and in such lovely young people as they are.) Canst thou thenfinde in thine heart to let them die, whom thou rather ought tohonour, and recompence with no meane rewards?When the King had heard this, and beleeved for a certainty, thatthe Admirall told him nothing but truth: he appointed not onely,that they should proceede no further, but also was exceedingsorrowfull for what he had done, sending presently to have themreleased from the Stake, and honourably to be brought before him.Being thus enstructed in their severall qualities, and standing induty obliged, to recompence the wrong which he had done, withrespective honours: he caused them to be cloathed in royallgarments, and knowing them to bee knit in unity of soule; the likehe did by marrying them solemnly together, and bestowing many richgifts and presents on them, sent them honourably attended home toIschia; where they were with much joy and comfort received, andlived long after in great felicity.
2.  "For this, and no other reason, did I presume to use the secretcunning which now is openly made knowne unto you: and Gisippusdisposed himselfe thereunto, which otherwise hee never determined tohave done, in contracting the marriage for me, and shee consentingto me in his name.
3.  Canigiano being much displeased at the repetition of his Follie,sharply reproved him, saying. Thou hast done leudly, in carying thyselfe so loosely, and spending thy Masters goods so carelesly, whichthough I cannot truly tearme spent, but rather art meerely cousenedand cheated of them, yet thou seest at what a deere rate thou hastpurchased pleasure, which yet is not utterly helplesse, but may by onemeanes or other be recovered. And being a man of woonderfullapprehension, advised him instantly what was to bee done, furnishinghim also with a summe of money, wherewith to adventure a second losse,in hope of recovering the first againe: he caused divers Packes tobe well bound up, with the Merchants markes orderly made on them,and bought about twenty Buttes or Barrelles, all filled (as it were)with Oyle, and these pretended commodities being shipt, Salabettoreturned with them to Palermo. Where having given in his packets tothe Customehouse, and entred them all under his owne name, as beingboth owner and factor: all his Wares were lockt up in his Magizine,with open publication, that he would not vent any of them, beforeother merchandises (which he daily expected) were there also arrived.
4.  When the Gentlewoman heard this, despairing of any consolation, orrevenge for her wrongs, shee resolved to checke the Kings deniall ofjustice, and comming before him weeping, spake in this manner. Sir,I presume not into your presence, as hoping to have redresse by you,for divers dishonourable injuries done unto me; but, as fullsatisfaction for them, doe but teach me how you suffer such vileabuses, as daily are offered to your selfe. To the end, that beingtherein instructed by you, I may the more patiently beare mine owne;which (as God knoweth) I would bestow on you very gladly, becauseyou know so well how to endure them.
5.   It came to passe within a while after, that on a time, (about highnoone) Sir Simon being walking abroad, chanced to meete withBentivegna, driving an Asse before him, laden with divers commodities,and demaunding of him, whither he went, Bentivegna, thus answered.In troth Sir Simon, I am going to the City, about some especiallbusinesse of mine owne, and I carry these things to SigniorBonacorci da Ginestreto, because he should helpe me before theJudge, when I shall be called in question concerning my patrimony. SirSimon looking merily on him, said. Thou doest well Bentivegna, to makea friend sure before thou need him; goe, take my blessing with thee,and returne againe with good successe. But if thou meet with Laguccio,or Naldino, forget not to tell them, that they must bring me myshooe-tyes before Sunday. Bentivegna said, hee would discharge hiserrand, and so parted from him, driving his Asse on towards Florence.
6.  Such was the apprehension of this witty Lady, that these wordsseemed to taxe her honour, or else to contaminate the hearersunderstanding, whereof there were great plenty about her, whosejudgement might be as vile, as the speeches were scandalous.Wherefore, never seeking for any further purgation of her cleareconscience, but onely to retort taunt for taunt, presently thus shereplied. My Lord, if I should make such a vile adventure, I wouldlooke to bee payde with better money.

应用

1.  WHEREIN IS FIGURED TO THE LIFE, THE NOTABLE KINDNESSE AND
2.  SPEAK OF WHATSOEVER THEMSELVES BEST PLEASETH
3.  In a short while after, Master Doctor Mazzeo was returned fromMalfy, to proceede in his cure of the poore mans legge; and callingfor his glasse of Water, which he left standing in his owne Chamberwindow, it was found quite empty, and not a drop in it: whereat heraged so extreamly, as never had the like impatience bene noted inhim. His wife, and her Maide, who had another kinde of businesse intheir braine, about a dead man so strangely come to life againe,knew not well what to say; but at the last, his Wife thus replyedsomewhat angerly. Sir (quoth she) what a coyle is here about apaltry glasse of Water, which perhaps hath bene spilt, yet neytherof us faulty therein? Is there no more such water to be had in theworld? Alas deere Wife (saide he) you might repute it to be a commonkinde of Water, but indeed it was not so; for I did purposely compoundit, onely to procure a dead seeming sleepe: And so related the wholematter at large, of the Pacients legge, and his Waters losse.
4、  The honest Knight, who was very sorrowfull for Aldobrandino,gladly gave attention to the Pilgrime, and having conferred on manymatters, appertaining to the fact committed: the two Brethren who wereTheobaldoes Hostes, and their Chambermaid, upon good advice given,were apprehended in their first sleep, without any resistance madein their defence. But when the tortures were sent for, to understandtruly how the case went, they would not endure any paine at all, buteach aside by himselfe, and then altogether confessed openly, thatthey did the deede, yet not knowing him to be Theobaldo Elisei. Andwhen it was demanded of them, upon what occasion they did so foulean act, they answered, that they were so hatefull against the manslife, because he would luxuriouslie have abused one of their wives,when they both were absent from their owne home.
5、  Within a short while after, report had acquainted the Judge, whereand how his wife was kept from him; whereupon hee determined, not tosend, but rather to go himselfe in person, and to redeeme her from thePyrate, with what summes of money he should demand. By sea he passedto Monaco, where he saw his wife, and she him, as (soone after) sheemade known to Pagamino. The next morning, Signior Ricciardo meetingwith Pagamino, made meanes to be acquainted with bim, and within lessethen an houres space, they grew into familiar conference; Pagamino yetpretending not to know him, but expected what issue this talke wouldsort to. When time served, the Judge discoursed the occasion of hiscomming thither, desiring him to demand what ransome he pleased, andthat he might have his wife home with him. Whereto Pagamino answered.

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  • 姚志江 08-04

      Andrea de Piero, travelling from Perouse to Naples to buy Horses,was (in the space of one night) surprised by three admirableaccidents, out of all which he fortunately escaped, and with a richRing, returned home to his owne house.

  • 谢瑞娥 08-04

      Which set my soule on fire, enflamde each part,

  • 希韦·加吉 08-04

       Now the Feast of Christmasse drawing neere, the Gentlewoman saidto her Husband; that, if it stood with his liking: she would do suchduty as fitted with so solemne a time, by going earely in a morningunto Church, there to be confessed, and receive her Saviour, asother Christians did. How now? replied the jealous Asse, what sinneshave you committed, that should neede confession? How Husband? quothshe, what do you thinke me to be a Saint? Who knoweth not, I pray you,that I am as subject to sinne, as any other Woman living in the world?But my sins are not to be revealed to you, because you are noPriest. These words enflamed his jealousie more violently then before,and needes must he know what sinnes she had committed, and havingresolved what to do in this case, made her answer: That hee wascontented with her motion, alwaies provided, that she went to no otherChurch, then unto their owne Chappel, betimes in a morning; andtheir own Chaplaine to confesse her, or some other Priest by himappointed, but not any other: and then she to returne home presentlyagaine. She being a woman of acute apprehension, presently collectedhis whole intention: but seeming to take no knowledge thereof,replyed, that she would not swerve from his direction.

  • 华怀特 08-04

      When Sicurano heard this horrible lye, immediately shee conceived,that this was the occasion of her husbands hatred to her, and allthe hard haps which she had since suffered: whereupon, shee reputed itfor more then a mortall sinne, if such a villaine should passe withoutdue punishment. Sicurano seemed to like well this report, and grewinto such familiarity with Ambroginolo, that (by her perswasions) whenthe Fayre was ended, she tooke him higher with her into Alexandria,and all his Wares along with him, furnishing him with a fit andconvenient shop, where he made great benefite of his Merchandizes,trusting all his monies in the Captaines custody, because it was thesafest course for him, and so hee continued there with no meanecontentment.

  • 巴高斯 08-03

    {  To die for him, it is my sole desire,

  • 苏虹 08-02

      Adam Philomena having concluded her discourse, and the rareacknowledgement, which Titus made of his esteemed friend Gisippus,extolled justly as it deserved by all the Company: the King, reservingthe last office to Dioneus (as it was at the first granted him)began to speake thus. Without all question to the contrary (worthyLadies) nothing can be more truely said, then what Madame Philomena,hath delivered, concerning Amity, and her complaint in theconclusion of her Novell, is not without great reason, to see it soslenderly reverenced and respected (now a dayes) among all men. But ifwe had met here in duty onely for correcting the abuses of iniquity,and the malevolent courses of this preposterous age; I could proceedfurther in this just cause of complaint. But because our end aimeth atmatters of other nature, it commeth to my memory to tel you of aHistory, which (perhaps) may seeme somewhat long, but altogetherpleasant, concerning a magnificent act of great Saladine: to theend, that by observing those things which you shall heare in myNovell, if we cannot (by reason of our manifold imperfections)intirely compasse the amity of any one; yet (at least) we may takedelight, in stretching our kindnesse (in good deeds) so farre as weare able, in hope one day after, some worthy reward will ensuethereon, as thereto justly appertaining.}

  • 徐晓华 08-02

      Needlesse were any fresh relation to you, what manner of peoplethose three men were, Calandrino, Bruno, and Buffalmaco, becausealready you have had sufficient understanding of them. Andtherefore, as an induction to my discourse, I must tell you, thatCalandrino had a small Country-house, in a Village some-what neereto Florence, which came to him by the marriage of his Wife. Amon otherCattle and Poultry, which he kept there in store, hee had a youngBoare readie fatted for Brawne, whereof yearly he used to kill one forhis owne provision; and alwaies in the month of December, he and hiswife resorted to their village house, to have a Brawne both killed andsalted.

  • 当·西普雷 08-02

      Gerbino, contrary to the former plighted faith of hisGrand-father, King Gulielmo, fought with a Ship at Sea, belonging tothe King of Thunis, to take away his Daughter, who was then in thesame Ship. Shee being slaine by them that had the possession of her,he likewise slew them; and afterward had his owne head smitten off.

  • 冯某翻 08-01

       Most noble Lady, the Gods forbid (if it be so as you have sayd) thatI should (Villain-like) soile the honour of him, that takes suchunusuall compassion of my unchaste appetite. And therefore, you mayremaine heere so long as you please, in no other condition, but asmine owne naturall borne Sister; and likewise, you may depart freelywhen you will: conditionally, that (on my behalfe) you render suchthankes to your husband, as you thinke convenient for his great bountytowards me, accounting me for ever heereafter, as his loyall Brotherand faithfull servant. Dianora having well observed his answer, herheart being ready to mount out at her mouth with joy, said. All theworld could never make mee beleeve (considering your honourableminde and honesty) that it would happen otherwise to me, then now ithath done, for which noble courtesie, I will continually remaineobliged to you. So, taking her leave, she returned home honorablyattended to her husband, and relating to him what had happened, itproved the occasion of begetting intire love and friendship,betweene himselfe and the Noble Lord Ansaldo.

  • 珍妮特·耶伦 07-30

    {  No sooner had Madam Aemillia finished her Novell, wherin, theexcellent wisdome of Piccarda, for so worthily punishing the luxuriousold Provoste, had generall commendations of the whole Assembly: butthe Queene, looking on Philostratus, said. I command you next tosupply the place: whereto he made answere, that hee was both ready andwilling, and then thus began. Honourable Ladies, the merryGentleman, so lately remembred by Madame Eliza, being named Maso delSaggio; causeth me to passe over an intended Tale, which I hadresolved on when it came to my turne: to report another concerninghim, and two men more, his friendly Companions. Which although itmay appeare to you somewhat unpleasing, in regard of a little grosseand unmannerly behaviour: yet it will move merriment without anyoffence, and that is the maine reason why I relate it.

  • 索尼娅 07-30

      The King hearing these words, sodainely presumed, that by somecounterfeit person or other, the Queene had beene this night beguiled:wherefore (very advisedly) hee considered, that in regard the partywas unknowne to her, and all the women about her; to make no outwardappearance of knowing it, but rather concealed it to himselfe. Farrefrom the indiscretion of some haire-braind men, who presently wouldhave answered and sworne; I came hither this night, till now.Whereupon many dangers might ensue, to the dishonour and prejudiceof the Queene: beside, her error being discovered to her, mightafterward be an occasion, to urge a wandring in her appetite, and tocovet after change againe. But by this silence, no shame redoundedto him or her, whereas prating, must needs be the publisher of openinfamie: yet was hee much vexed in his minde, which neither bylookes or words hee would discover, but pleasantly said to the Queene,Why Madam, although I was once heere before to night, I hope youmislike not my second seeing you, nor if I should please to comeagaine. No truly Sir, quoth she, I onely desire you to have care ofyour health. Well, said the King, I will follow your counsaile, andnow returne to mine owne lodging againe, committing my Queene to hergood rest.

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