0 下载菲律宾彩票网-APP安装下载

下载菲律宾彩票网 注册最新版下载

下载菲律宾彩票网 注册

下载菲律宾彩票网注册

类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:肖淑芬 大小:h5zorcAk52935KB 下载:gGoDj7Mu18327次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:OVUqJY9e58059条
日期:2020-08-05 05:13:48
安卓
兰宁远

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Or liv'd so happily as I.
2.  There dwelt in Sienna, and not many yeeres since, two young men ofequall age, both of them bearing the name of Francesco: but the onewas descended of the Aniollieri, and the other likewise of theFortarigi; so that they were commonly called Aniolliero, andFortarigo, both Gentlemen, and well derived. Now, although in manyother matters, their complexions did differ very much: Yetnotwithstanding, they varied not in one bad qualitie, namely too greatneglect of their Fathers, which caused their more frequentconversation, as very familiar and respective friends. ButAniolliero (being a very goodly and faire conditioned young Gentleman)apparently perceiving, that he could not maintaine himselfe at Sienna,in such estate as he liked, and upon the pension allowed him by hisFather, hearing also, that at the Marquisate of Ancona, there livedthe Popes Legate, a worthy Cardinall, his much indeared good Lordand friend: he intended to goe visite him, as hoping to advance hisfortunes by him.
3.  Wherefore, never be distrustfull of mee, but resolvedly buildeupon my courage. And in regard of my more honourable entertainment,I will then weare my Scarlet Gowne and Hood, wherein I receyved mygraduation; and then do both of you observe, what a rejoycing willbe among the whole company, at the entertaining of such a man as I am,enough to create me Captaine immediatly. You shall perceive also howthe case will go, after I have beene there but a while, in regard thatthe Countesse (having as yet never seene me) is so deepely enamored ofmee: she cannot choose but bestow the Bathe and Knighthood on me,which shee shall have the more honour of, in regard I am well ableto maintaine it, therefore referre all the rest to mee, and nevermisdoubt your injurie or mine.
4.  WHEREIN IS DECLARED, THE FIRME LOYALTIE OF A TRUE LOVER: AND HOW
5.  Well may you imagine that Massetto was no misse-proud man now, to bethus advanced from the Garden to the Chamber, and by no worse womanthen the Lady Abbesse her selfe: what signes, shews, or whatlanguage he speaks there, I am not able to expresse; onely itappeared, that his behaviour pleased her so well, as it procured hisdaily repairing thether; and acquainted her with such familiarconversation, as she would have condemned in the Nunnes her daughters,but that they were wise enough to keepe it from her. Now beganMassetto to consider, that hee had undertaken a taske belonging togreat Hercules, in giving content to so many, and by continuingdumbe in this maner, it would redound to his no meane detriment.Whereupon, as he was one night sitting by the Abbesse, the string thatretained his tongue from speech, brake on a sodaine, and thus hespake.
6.  By sight of such as do allure,

计划指导

1.  When the King heard this reply, he knew well enough the occasionof his Henne dinner, as also, what vertue lay couched under heranswere; perceiving apparantly, that wanton words would prove but invaine, and such a woman was not easily to be seduced; wherefore, ashee grew enamored on her inconsiderately, so he found it bestfitting for his honour, to quench this heate with wisedome discreetly.And so, without any more words, or further hope of speeding in sounkingly a purpose, dinner being ended, by a sudden departing, hesmoothly shadowed the cause of his comming, and thanking her for thehonour shee had done him, commended her to her chaste disposition, andposted away with speede to Gennes.
2.  Great Saladine (answered Thorella) effects (without words) havealready sufficiently warranted your Gracious disposition towards me,farre beyond any requitall remayning in me; your word onely beingenough for my comfort in this case, either dying or living. But inregard you have taken such order for my departure hence, I desire tohave it done with all possible expedition, because to morrow is thevery last day, that I am to be absent. Saladine protested that itshould be done, and the same evening in the great Hall of his Pallace,commanded a rich and costly Bedde to be set up, the mattras formedafter the Alexandrian manner, of Velvet and cloth Gold, the Quilts,counterpoints and coverings, sumptuously imbroydered with OrientPearles and Precious Stones, supposed to be of inestimable value,and two rarely wrought Pillowes, such as best beseemed so stately aBedde, the Curtaines and Vallans every way equall to the other pompe.
3.  As a loyall Maide,
4.  When morning was come the kindred and friends on either side,understanding the truth of the errour committed, and knowing beside,what punishment would be inflicted on the prisoners, if Jacominopressed the matter no further, then as with reason and equity wellhe might; they repaired to him, and (in gentle speeches) entreatedhim, not to regard a wrong offered by unruly and youthfull people,meerely drawne into the action by perswasion of friends; submittingboth themselves, and the offendors, to such satisfaction as [he]pleased to appoint them. Jacomino, who had seene and observed manythings in his time, and was a man of sound understanding, returnedthem this answer.
5.  When Calandrino had well slept after his Wine, he arose in themorning, and being descended downe the staires; finding the streetdoore wide open, he looked for the Brawne, but it was gone.Enquiring of the neighbours dwelling neere about him, hee couldheare no tydings of his Brawne, but became the wofullest man in theworld, telling every one that his Brawne was stolne. Bruno andBuffalmaco being risen in the morning, they went to visiteCalandrino to heare how he tooke the losse of his Brawne: and hee nosooner had a sight of them, but he called them to him; and with theteares running downe his cheekes, sayde: Ah my deare friendes, I amrobde of my Brawne. Bruno stepping closely to him, sayde in hiseare: It is wonderfull, that once in thy life time thou canst beewise. How? answered Calandrino, I speake to you in good earnest.Speake so still in earnest (replied Bruno) and cry it out so loud asthou canst, then let who list beleeve it to be true.
6.  Now the Feast of Christmasse drawing neere, the Gentlewoman saidto her Husband; that, if it stood with his liking: she would do suchduty as fitted with so solemne a time, by going earely in a morningunto Church, there to be confessed, and receive her Saviour, asother Christians did. How now? replied the jealous Asse, what sinneshave you committed, that should neede confession? How Husband? quothshe, what do you thinke me to be a Saint? Who knoweth not, I pray you,that I am as subject to sinne, as any other Woman living in the world?But my sins are not to be revealed to you, because you are noPriest. These words enflamed his jealousie more violently then before,and needes must he know what sinnes she had committed, and havingresolved what to do in this case, made her answer: That hee wascontented with her motion, alwaies provided, that she went to no otherChurch, then unto their owne Chappel, betimes in a morning; andtheir own Chaplaine to confesse her, or some other Priest by himappointed, but not any other: and then she to returne home presentlyagaine. She being a woman of acute apprehension, presently collectedhis whole intention: but seeming to take no knowledge thereof,replyed, that she would not swerve from his direction.

推荐功能

1.  Having imparted all her fortunes to the good old Lady with whomshe dwelt; she told her beside, that she had an earnest desire tosee Thunis, to satisfie her eyes as well as her eares, concerningthe rumor blazed abroad. The good old Lady commended her desire, and(even as if she had bene her Mother) tooke her with her aboord aBarke, and so sayled thence to Thunis, where both she and Constancefound honourable welcome, in the house of a kinsman to the SarazinLady. Carapresa also went along with them thither, and her they sentabroad into the City, to understand the newes of Martuccio Gomito.After they knew for a certainty that he was living, and in greatauthority about the King, according as the former report went ofhim. Then the good old Lady, being desirous to let Martuccio know,that his faire friend Constance was come thither to see him; wenther selfe to the place of his abiding, and spake unto him in thismanner. Noble Martuccio, there is a servant of thine in my house,which came from Liparis, and requireth to have a little privateconference with thee: but because I durst not trust any other with themessage, my selfe (at her entreaty) am come to acquaint theetherewith. Martuccio gave her kinde and hearty thankes, and thenwent along with her to the house.
2.  This argument seemed not very pleasing to the Ladies, andtherefore they urged an alteration thereof, to some matter bettersuting with the day, and their discoursing: whereto thus heanswered. Ladies, I know as well as your selves, why you would havethis instant argument altered: but to change me from it you have nopower, considering the season is such, as shielding all (both menand women) from medling with any dishonest action; it is lawfull forus to speake of what wee please. And know you not, that through thesad occasion of the time, which now overruleth us, the judges haveforsaken their venerable benches, the Lawes (both divine and humane)ceasing, granting ample license to every one, to do what bestagreeth with the conservation of life? Therefore, if your honestiesdoe straine themselves a little, both in thinking and speaking, notfor prosecution of any immodest deede, but onely for familiar andblamelesse entercourse: I cannot devise a more convenient ground, atleast that carrieth apparant reason, for reproofe of perils, toensue by any of you. Moreover, your company, which hath bin mosthonest, since the first day of our meeting, to this instant: appearethnot any jot to be disgraced, by any thing either said or done, neithershal be (I hope) in the meanest degree.
3.  But, seeing thou art so constant in thy pernitious resolve, asneither thine owne good Nature, nor this lamentable sufferance inme, are able to alter thee: I will prepare my self for deathpatiently, to the end, that Heaven may be mercifull to my soul, andreward thee justly, according to thy cruelty. Which words being ended,she withdrew her selfe towards the middest of the Tarras, despairingof escaping (with life)
4.  Upon this immodest meditation, and his purpose quite altered whichhe came for; he went neerer to her, and very kindly began to comforther, desiring her to forbeare weeping: and (by further insinuatingspeeches) acquainted her with his amorous intention. The Maide, whowas made neither of yron nor diamond, and seeking to prevent one shameby another, was easily wonne to the Abbots will, which caused him toembrace and kisse her often.
5.   Sir, I have heard of a certaine man, named Primasso, one skilfullylearned in the Grammar, and (beyond all other) a very witty andready versifier: in regard whereof, he was so much admired, andfarre renowned, that such as never saw him, but onely heard of him,could easily say, this is Primasso. It came to passe, that beingonce at Paris, in poore estate, as commonly he could light on nobetter fortune (because vertue is slenderly rewarded, by such ashave the greatest possessions) he heard much fame of the Abbot ofClugni, a man reputed (next to the Pope) to be the richest Prelateof the Church. Of him he heard wonderfull and magnificent matters,that he alwayes kept an open and hospitable Court, and never maderefusall of any (from whence soever hee came or went) but they dideate and drinke freely there; provided, that they came when theAbbot was set at the Table. Primasso hearing this, and being anearnest desirer to see magnificent and vertuous men, hee resolved togoe see this rare bounty of the Abbot, demanding how far he dwelt fromParis? Being answered, about some three Leagues thence. Primassomade account, that if he went on betimes in the morning, he shouldeasily reach thither before the houre for dinner.
6.  So that Frederigo departed thence, both with the losse of his labourand supper. But a neighbour of mine, who is a woman of good yeares,told me, that both the one and other were true, as she her selfeheard, when she was a little Girle. And concerning the latteraccident, it was not to John of Lorrayne, but to another, named Johnde Nello, that dwelt at S. Peters Gate, and of the same professionas John of Lorrayne was. Wherefore (faire Ladies) it remaineth in yourowne choice, to entertain which of the two prayers you please, or bothtogether if you will: for they are of extraordinary vertue in suchstrange occurrences, as you have heeretofore heard, and (upon doubt)may prove by experience. It shall not therefore be amisse for you,to learne them both by hart, for (peradventure) they may stand youin good sted, if ever you chance to have the like occasion.

应用

1.  Jehannot hearing these words, became exceeding sorrowfull, and saydwithin himselfe; I have lost all the paines which I did thinke to bewell employed, as hoping to have this man converted heere. For, ifhe go to the Court of Rome, and behold there the wickednes of thePriests lives, farewell all hope in me, of ever seeing him to become aChristian. But rather, were he already a Christian, without allquestion he would turne a Jew. And so going neerer to Abraham, hesaid. Alas my loving friend, why shouldst thou undertake such atedious travel, and so great a charge, as thy journey from hence toRome will cost thee? Consider, that to a rich man (as thou art)travaile by land or Sea is full of infinite dangers. Doest thou notthinke, that here are Religious men enow, who wil gladly bestowBaptisme upon thee? To mee therefore it plainely appeareth, thatsuch a voyage is to no purpose. If thou standest upon any doubt orscruple, concerning the faith whereto I wish thee; where canst thoudesire conference with greater Doctours, or men more learned in allrespects, then this famous Cittie doth affoord thee, to resolve theein any questionable case? Thou must thinke, that the Prelates are suchthere, as heere thou seest them to be, and yet they must needes bein much better condition at Rome, because they are neere to theprincipall Pastor. And therefore, if thou wilt credit my counsell,reserve this journey to some time more convenient, when the Jubilee ofgenerall Pardon happeneth, and then (perchance) I will beare theecompany, and go along with thee as in vowed Pilgrimage.
2.  When shee saw the Chest drawing neere her, and not discerning theshape of any man, shee grew fearefull, and retyring from it, cried outaloude. He had no power of speaking to her, neither did his sightdoe him the smallest service; but even as the waves and windespleased, the Chest was driven still neerer to the Land, and then thewoman perceyved that it had the forme of a ofer, and looking moreadvisedly, beheld two armes extended over it, and afterward, sheespied the face of a man, not being able to judge, whether he werealive, or no. Moved by charitable and womanly compassion, shee steptin among the billowes, and getting fast holde on the hayre of hishead, drew both the Chest and him to the Land, and calling forth herDaughters to helpe her, with much adoe she unfolded his armes from theChest, setting it up on her Daughters head, and then betweene them,Landolpho was led into the Towne, and there conveyed into a warmeStove, where quickly he recovered by her pains, his strengthbenummed with extreame cold.
3.  About foure or five yeeres after the birth of her daughter, sheeconceived with child againe, and (at the limitted houre ofdeliverance) had a goodly Sonne, to the no little liking of theMarquesse. Afterward, a strange humour entred into his braine, namely,that by a long continued experience, and courses of intollerablequality; he would needes make proofe of his faire Wives patience.First he began to provoke her by injurious speeches, shewing fierceand frowning lookes to her, intimating; that his people grewdispleased with him, in regard of his Wives base birth andeducation, and so much the rather, because she was likely to bringchildren, who (by her blood) were no better then beggers, and murmuredat the daughter already borne. Which words when Grizelda heard,without any alteration of countenance, for the least distemperature inany appearing action she said.
4、  Friar Reynard, falling in love with a Gentlewoman, Wife to a manof good account; found the meanes to become her Gossip. Afterward,he being conferring closely with her in her Chamber, and her Husbandcoming sodainly thither: she made him beleeve, that he came thitherfor no other end; but to cure his God-sonne by a charme, of adangerous disease which he had by Wormes.
5、  Signior Andrea, you are the most welcome friend to me in theworld; sealing this salutation with infinite sweet kisses andembraces: whereat (in wonderfull amazement) he being strangelytransported, replied; Madame, you honour me beyond all compasse ofmerit. Then, taking him by the hand, shee guided him thorough a goodlyHall, into her owne Chamber, which was delicately embalmed with Roses,Orenge flowers, and all other pleasing smelles, and a costly bed inthe middest, curtained round about, verie artificiall Picturesbeautifying the walles, with many other embellishments, such asthose Countries are liberally stored withall. He being meerely anovice in these kinds of wanton carriages of the World, and freefrom any base or degenerate conceite; firmely perswaded himselfe, that(questionlesse) she was a Lady of no meane esteeme, and he more thenhappy, to be thus respected and honored by her. They both being seatedon a curious Chest at the beds feete, teares cunningly trickling downeher Cheekes, and sighes intermedled with inward sobbings, breathedfoorth in sad, but verie seemely manner, thus shee beganne.

旧版特色

!

网友评论(KWQHyjZ123307))

  • 皮曙初 08-04

      Supposing there to finde a solemne peace:

  • 赵坤 08-04

      I make my moane to thee, and do not fable,

  • 乐嘉携 08-04

       Beleeve it for a truth,

  • 谢永刚 08-04

      But now (being dead) they all are gone, and wanting.

  • 骆圣 08-03

    {  The other kinde is a most precious Stone indeede, which our bestLapidaries call the Helitropium, the vertue whereof is so admirable;as whosoever beareth it about him, so long as he keepeth it, it isimpossible for any eye to discerne him, because he walketh meerelyinvisible. O Lord Sir (quoth Calandrino) those stones are of rarevertue indeede: but where else may a man finde that Helitropium?Whereto Maso thus answered: That Countrey onely doth not containethe Helitropium; for they be many times found upon our plaine ofMugnone. Of what bignesse Sir (quoth Calandrino) is the Stone, andwhat coulour? The Helitropium, answered Maso, is not alwayes of onequality, because some are bigge, and others lesse; but all are ofone coulour, namely blacke.

  • 王星云 08-02

      Old or new thoughts cannot in any fashion}

  • 张婷 08-02

      WHEREIN IS DECLARED, OF WHAT WORTH IT IS TO CONFESSE

  • 平震宇 08-02

      In the time of Azzo, Marquesse of Ferrara, there was a Marchantnamed Rinaldo de Este, who being one day at Bologna, about someespeciall businesse of his owne; his occasions there ended, and ridingfrom thence towards Verona, he fell in company with other Horsemen,seeming to be Merchants like himselfe, but indeede were Theeves, menof most badde life and conversation; yet he having no such mistrust ofthem, rode on, conferring with them very familiarly. They perceivinghim to be a Merchant, and likely to have some store of money abouthim, concluded betweene themselves to rob him, so soone as theyfound apt place and opportunity. But because he should conceive nosuch suspition, they rode on like modest men, talking honestly andfriendly with him, of good parts and disposition appearing in him,offering him all humble and gracious service, accounting themselveshappy by his companie, as hee returned the same courtesie to them,because hee was alone, and but one servant with him.

  • 娄艺潇 08-01

       All these in one faire flower,

  • 孙军涛 07-30

    {  It came to passe, that at the same time; in the Port of theCittie, called Caffa, there lay then a Ship laden with Merchandize,being bound thence for Smyrna, of which Ship two Geneway Merchants(being brethren) were the Patrons and Owners, who had givendirection for hoysing the sailes to depart thence when the windeshould serve. With these two Genewayes Amurath had covenanted, forhimselfe to goe aboord the ship the night ensuing, and the Lady in hiscompany. When night was come, having resolved with himselfe what wasto be done: in a disguised habite hee went to the house of Bajazeth,who stood not any way doubtfull of him, and with certaine of hismost faithfull Confederates (whom he had sworne to the intendedaction) they hid themselves closely in the house. After some part ofthe night was over-past, he knowing the severall lodgings both ofBajazeth and Alathiella, slew his brother soundly sleeping; andseizing on the Lady, whom he found awake and weeping, threatned tokill her also, if she made any noyse. So, being well furnished withthe greater part of worldly jewels belonging to Bajazeth, unheard orundescried by any body, they went presently to the Port, and there(without any further delay) Amurath and the Lady were received intothe Ship, but his companions returned backe againe; when the Mariners,having their sailes ready set, and the winde aptly fitting for them,lanched forth merrily into the maine.

  • 樊亚茹 07-30

      Eares, while you heard her sweete delitious straines,

提交评论