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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:卓智 大小:OJBnjG0Q49627KB 下载:Zne8OH0c61331次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:2czJ6oo631920条
日期:2020-08-06 12:33:22
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say somethingmyself. I am much shocked about what you have said about theinsolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such aman as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, orhas some god set your people against you? May you not complain of yourbrothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you areand in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, butI would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would ratherdie fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights dayafter day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the womenservants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never beaccomplished."
2.  "My friends," said he, "this voyage of Telemachus's is a veryserious matter; we had made sure that it would come to nothing. Now,however, let us draw a ship into the water, and get a crew together tosend after the others and tell them to come back as fast as they can."
3.  "Look to it yourself, father," answered Telemachus, "for they sayyou are the wisest counsellor in the world, and that there is no othermortal man who can compare with you. We will follow you with rightgood will, nor shall you find us fail you in so far as our strengthholds out."
4.  "And I saw Leda the wife of Tyndarus, who bore him two famoussons, Castor breaker of horses, and Pollux the mighty boxer. Boththese heroes are lying under the earth, though they are still alive,for by a special dispensation of Jove, they die and come to lifeagain, each one of them every other day throughout all time, andthey have the rank of gods.
5.  Telemachus approved of what his father had said, so he callednurse Euryclea and said, "Nurse, shut the women up in their room,while I take the armour that my father left behind him down into thestore room. No one looks after it now my father is gone, and it hasgot all smirched with soot during my own boyhood. I want to take itdown where the smoke cannot reach it."
6.  "I have come, sir replied Telemachus, "to see if you can tell meanything about my father. I am being eaten out of house and home; myfair estate is being wasted, and my house is full of miscreants whokeep killing great numbers of my sheep and oxen, on the pretence ofpaying their addresses to my mother. Therefore, I am suppliant at yourknees if haply you may tell me about my father's melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller; for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for myself, but tell me in all plainness exactlywhat you saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal serviceeither by word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed by theTrojans, bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."

计划指导

1.  Thus they spoke, for they thought that he had killed Antinous bymistake, and did not perceive that death was hanging over the headof every one of them. But Ulysses glared at them and said:
2.  "'First he will look over all his seals, and count them; then,when he has seen them and tallied them on his five fingers, he will goto sleep among them, as a shepherd among his sheep. The moment you seethat he is asleep seize him; put forth all your strength and holdhim fast, for he will do his very utmost to get away from you. He willturn himself into every kind of creature that goes upon the earth, andwill become also both fire and water; but you must hold him fast andgrip him tighter and tighter, till he begins to talk to you andcomes back to what he was when you saw him go to sleep; then you mayslacken your hold and let him go; and you can ask him which of thegods it is that is angry with you, and what you must do to reachyour home over the seas.'
3.  Then the vision said, "Take heart, and be not so much dismayed.There is one gone with him whom many a man would be glad enough tohave stand by his side, I mean Minerva; it is she who has compassionupon you, and who has sent me to bear you this message."
4.  Into this harbour, then, they took their ship, for they knew theplace, She had so much way upon her that she ran half her own lengthon to the shore; when, however, they had landed, the first thingthey did was to lift Ulysses with his rug and linen sheet out of theship, and lay him down upon the sand still fast asleep. Then they tookout the presents which Minerva had persuaded the Phaeacians to givehim when he was setting out on his voyage homewards. They put theseall together by the root of the olive tree, away from the road, forfear some passer by might come and steal them before Ulysses awoke;and then they made the best of their way home again.
5.  While Ulysses was thus yielding himself to a very deep slumberthat eased the burden of his sorrows, his admirable wife awoke, andsitting up in her bed began to cry. When she had relieved herself byweeping she prayed to Diana saying, "Great Goddess Diana, daughterof Jove, drive an arrow into my heart and slay me; or let somewhirlwind snatch me up and bear me through paths of darkness till itdrop me into the mouths of overflowing Oceanus, as it did thedaughters of Pandareus. The daughters of Pandareus lost their fatherand mother, for the gods killed them, so they were left orphans. ButVenus took care of them, and fed them on cheese, honey, and sweetwine. Juno taught them to excel all women in beauty of form andunderstanding; Diana gave them an imposing presence, and Minervaendowed them with every kind of accomplishment; but one day when Venushad gone up to Olympus to see Jove about getting them married (forwell does he know both what shall happen and what not happen toevery one) the storm winds came and spirited them away to becomehandmaids to the dread Erinyes. Even so I wish that the gods wholive in heaven would hide me from mortal sight, or that fair Dianamight strike me, for I would fain go even beneath the sad earth if Imight do so still looking towards Ulysses only, and without havingto yield myself to a worse man than he was. Besides, no matter howmuch people may grieve by day, they can put up with it so long as theycan sleep at night, for when the eyes are closed in slumber peopleforget good and ill alike; whereas my misery haunts me even in mydreams. This very night methought there was one lying by my side whowas like Ulysses as he was when he went away with his host, and Irejoiced, for I believed that it was no dream, but the very truthitself."
6.  As she spoke she infused fresh vigour into him, and when he hadprayed to her he poised his spear and hurled it. He hit Eupeithes'helmet, and the spear went right through it, for the helmet stayedit not, and his armour rang rattling round him as he fell heavily tothe ground. Meantime Ulysses and his son fell the front line of thefoe and smote them with their swords and spears; indeed, they wouldhave killed every one of them, and prevented them from ever gettinghome again, only Minerva raised her voice aloud, and made every onepause. "Men of Ithaca," she cried, cease this dreadful war, and settlethe matter at once without further bloodshed."

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1.  "If you are Ulysses," said he, "then what you have said is just.We have done much wrong on your lands and in your house. ButAntinous who was the head and front of the offending lies low already.It was all his doing. It was not that he wanted to marry Penelope;he did not so much care about that; what he wanted was something quitedifferent, and Jove has not vouchsafed it to him; he wanted to killyour son and to be chief man in Ithaca. Now, therefore, that he hasmet the death which was his due, spare the lives of your people. Wewill make everything good among ourselves, and pay you in full for allthat we have eaten and drunk. Each one of us shall pay you a fineworth twenty oxen, and we will keep on giving you gold and bronze tillyour heart is softened. Until we have done this no one can complain ofyour being enraged against us."
2.  As he spoke he went inside the buildings to the cloister where thesuitors were, but Argos died as soon as he had recognized his master.
3.  "Run and fetch them," answered Ulysses, "while my arrows hold out,or when I am alone they may get me away from the door."
4.  On this they rose and went to the water side. The crew then drew theship on shore; their servants took their armour from them, and theywent up in a body to the place of assembly, but they would not let anyone old or young sit along with them, and Antinous, son ofEupeithes, spoke first.
5.   Such was his story, but Minerva smiled and caressed him with herhand. Then she took the form of a woman, fair, stately, and wise,"He must be indeed a shifty lying fellow," said she, "who couldsurpass you in all manner of craft even though you had a god foryour antagonist. Dare-devil that you are, full of guile, unwearying indeceit, can you not drop your tricks and your instinctive falsehood,even now that you are in your own country again? We will say nomore, however, about this, for we can both of us deceive uponoccasion- you are the most accomplished counsellor and orator amongall mankind, while I for diplomacy and subtlety have no equal amongthe gods. Did you not know Jove's daughter Minerva- me, who havebeen ever with you, who kept watch over you in all your troubles,and who made the Phaeacians take so great a liking to you? And now,again, I am come here to talk things over with you, and help you tohide the treasure I made the Phaeacians give you; I want to tell youabout the troubles that await you in your own house; you have got toface them, but tell no one, neither man nor woman, that you havecome home again. Bear everything, and put up with every man'sinsolence, without a word."
6.  "And a pretty figure I should cut then," replied Eumaeus, both nowand hereafter, if I were to kill you after receiving you into my hutand showing you hospitality. I should have to say my prayers in goodearnest if I did; but it is just supper time and I hope my men willcome in directly, that we may cook something savoury for supper."

应用

1.  "May heaven," answered Ulysses, "requite to them the wickedness withwhich they deal high-handedly in another man's house without any senseof shame."
2.  Now the night came on stormy and very dark, for there was no moon.It poured without ceasing, and the wind blew strong from the West,which is a wet quarter, so Ulysses thought he would see whetherEumaeus, in the excellent care he took of him, would take off hisown cloak and give it him, or make one of his men give him one."Listen to me," said he, "Eumaeus and the rest of you; when I havesaid a prayer I will tell you something. It is the wine that makesme talk in this way; wine will make even a wise man fall to singing;it will make him chuckle and dance and say many a word that he hadbetter leave unspoken; still, as I have begun, I will go on. Wouldthat I were still young and strong as when we got up an ambuscadebefore Troy. Menelaus and Ulysses were the leaders, but I was incommand also, for the other two would have it so. When we had comeup to the wall of the city we crouched down beneath our armour and laythere under cover of the reeds and thick brush-wood that grew aboutthe swamp. It came on to freeze with a North wind blowing; the snowfell small and fine like hoar frost, and our shields were coated thickwith rime. The others had all got cloaks and shirts, and sleptcomfortably enough with their shields about their shoulders, but I hadcarelessly left my cloak behind me, not thinking that I should betoo cold, and had gone off in nothing but my shirt and shield. Whenthe night was two-thirds through and the stars had shifted their theirplaces, I nudged Ulysses who was close to me with my elbow, and heat once gave me his ear.
3.  "My dear child," answered Eurynome, "all that you have said is true,go and tell your son about it, but first wash yourself and anoint yourface. Do not go about with your cheeks all covered with tears; it isnot right that you should grieve so incessantly; for Telemachus,whom you always prayed that you might live to see with a beard, isalready grown up."
4、  "Here Perimedes and Eurylochus held the victims, while I drew mysword and dug the trench a cubit each way. I made a drink-offeringto all the dead, first with honey and milk, then with wine, andthirdly with water, and I sprinkled white barley meal over thewhole, praying earnestly to the poor feckless ghosts, and promisingthem that when I got back to Ithaca I would sacrifice a barrenheifer for them, the best I had, and would load the pyre with goodthings. I also particularly promised that Teiresias should have ablack sheep to himself, the best in all my flocks. When I had prayedsufficiently to the dead, I cut the throats of the two sheep and letthe blood run into the trench, whereon the ghosts came trooping upfrom Erebus- brides, young bachelors, old men worn out with toil,maids who had been crossed in love, and brave men who had beenkilled in battle, with their armour still smirched with blood; theycame from every quarter and flitted round the trench with a strangekind of screaming sound that made me turn pale with fear. When I sawthem coming I told the men to be quick and flay the carcasses of thetwo dead sheep and make burnt offerings of them, and at the sametime to repeat prayers to Hades and to Proserpine; but I sat where Iwas with my sword drawn and would not let the poor feckless ghostscome near the blood till Teiresias should have answered my questions.
5、  With these words he placed the double cup in the hands ofTelemachus, while Megapenthes brought the beautiful mixing-bowl andset it before him. Hard by stood lovely Helen with the robe ready inher hand.

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  • 李韶平 08-05

      "It was day-break by the time she had done speaking, so shedressed me in my shirt and cloak. As for herself she threw a beautifullight gossamer fabric over her shoulders, fastening it with a goldengirdle round her waist, and she covered her head with a mantle. Then Iwent about among the men everywhere all over the house, and spokekindly to each of them man by man: 'You must not lie sleeping here anylonger,' said I to them, 'we must be going, for Circe has told meall about it.' And this they did as I bade them.

  • 雍塞 08-05

      Ulysses smiled at him and answered, "Fear not; Telemachus hassaved your life, that you may know in future, and tell other people,how greatly better good deeds prosper than evil ones. Go, therefore,outside the cloisters into the outer court, and be out of the way ofthe slaughter- you and the bard- while I finish my work here inside."

  • 李光洁 08-05

       Then Pisistratus said, "Menelaus, son of Atreus, you are right inthinking that this young man is Telemachus, but he is very modest, andis ashamed to come here and begin opening up discourse with onewhose conversation is so divinely interesting as your own. Myfather, Nestor, sent me to escort him hither, for he wanted to knowwhether you could give him any counsel or suggestion. A son has alwaystrouble at home when his father has gone away leaving him withoutsupporters; and this is how Telemachus is now placed, for his fatheris absent, and there is no one among his own people to stand by him."

  • 高森昶 08-05

      "'So far so good,' said she, when I had ended my story, 'and now payattention to what I am about to tell you- heaven itself, indeed,will recall it to your recollection. First you will come to the Sirenswho enchant all who come near them. If any one unwarily draws in tooclose and hears the singing of the Sirens, his wife and childrenwill never welcome him home again, for they sit in a green field andwarble him to death with the sweetness of their song. There is a greatheap of dead men's bones lying all around, with the flesh stillrotting off them. Therefore pass these Sirens by, and stop yourmen's ears with wax that none of them may hear; but if you like youcan listen yourself, for you may get the men to bind you as youstand upright on a cross-piece half way up the mast, and they mustlash the rope's ends to the mast itself, that you may have thepleasure of listening. If you beg and pray the men to unloose you,then they must bind you faster.

  • 韩兆 08-04

    {  With this he drove his goodly steeds back to the city of the Pyliansand soon reached his home, but Telemachus called the men togetherand gave his orders. "Now, my men," said he, "get everything inorder on board the ship, and let us set out home."

  • 黄春康 08-03

      As he spoke he went on board, and bade the others do so also andloose the hawsers, so they took their places in the ship. ButTelemachus bound on his sandals, and took a long and doughty spearwith a head of sharpened bronze from the deck of the ship. Then theyloosed the hawsers, thrust the ship off from land, and made on towardsthe city as they had been told to do, while Telemachus strode on asfast as he could, till he reached the homestead where his countlessherds of swine were feeding, and where dwelt the excellentswineherd, who was so devoted a servant to his master.}

  • 马骏祥 08-03

      Thereon he floated about for two nights and two days in the water,with a heavy swell on the sea and death staring him in the face; butwhen the third day broke, the wind fell and there was a dead calmwithout so much as a breath of air stirring. As he rose on the swellhe looked eagerly ahead, and could see land quite near. Then, aschildren rejoice when their dear father begins to get better afterhaving for a long time borne sore affliction sent him by some angryspirit, but the gods deliver him from evil, so was Ulysses thankfulwhen he again saw land and trees, and swam on with all his strengththat he might once more set foot upon dry ground. When, however, hegot within earshot, he began to hear the surf thundering up againstthe rocks, for the swell still broke against them with a terrificroar. Everything was enveloped in spray; there were no harbourswhere a ship might ride, nor shelter of any kind, but onlyheadlands, low-lying rocks, and mountain tops.

  • 陈玉玲 08-03

      The others assented, so they went inside and laid their cloaks onthe benches and seats. They sacrificed the sheep, goats, pigs, and theheifer, and when the inward meats were cooked they served themround. They mixed the wine in the mixing-bowls, and the swineherd gaveevery man his cup, while Philoetius handed round the bread in thebreadbaskets, and Melanthius poured them out their wine. Then theylaid their hands upon the good things that were before them.

  • 李小平 08-02

       Then Theoclymenus said, 'And what, my dear young friend, is tobecome of me? To whose house, among all your chief men, am I torepair? or shall I go straight to your own house and to your mother?"

  • 马文艳 07-31

    {  "I should have done so at once," replied Neptune, "if I were notanxious to avoid anything that might displease you; now, therefore,I should like to wreck the Phaecian ship as it is returning from itsescort. This will stop them from escorting people in future; and Ishould also like to bury their city under a huge mountain."

  • 方辉 07-31

      "Here Perimedes and Eurylochus held the victims, while I drew mysword and dug the trench a cubit each way. I made a drink-offeringto all the dead, first with honey and milk, then with wine, andthirdly with water, and I sprinkled white barley meal over thewhole, praying earnestly to the poor feckless ghosts, and promisingthem that when I got back to Ithaca I would sacrifice a barrenheifer for them, the best I had, and would load the pyre with goodthings. I also particularly promised that Teiresias should have ablack sheep to himself, the best in all my flocks. When I had prayedsufficiently to the dead, I cut the throats of the two sheep and letthe blood run into the trench, whereon the ghosts came trooping upfrom Erebus- brides, young bachelors, old men worn out with toil,maids who had been crossed in love, and brave men who had beenkilled in battle, with their armour still smirched with blood; theycame from every quarter and flitted round the trench with a strangekind of screaming sound that made me turn pale with fear. When I sawthem coming I told the men to be quick and flay the carcasses of thetwo dead sheep and make burnt offerings of them, and at the sametime to repeat prayers to Hades and to Proserpine; but I sat where Iwas with my sword drawn and would not let the poor feckless ghostscome near the blood till Teiresias should have answered my questions.

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