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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:范妮 大小:UpqZZgjK13120KB 下载:yQYAC6zL54555次
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日期:2020-08-05 22:30:21
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."
2.  "Here I am, my dear sir," said he, "stay your hand therefore, andtell your father, or he will kill me in his rage against the suitorsfor having wasted his substance and been so foolishly disrespectful toyourself."
3.  Thus did he speak. His hearers all of them approved his saying andagreed that he should have his escort inasmuch as he had spokenreasonably. Alcinous therefore said to his servant, "Pontonous, mixsome wine and hand it round to everybody, that we may offer a prayerto father Jove, and speed our guest upon his way."
4.  "Thus did they speak and I assented. Thereon through the livelongday to the going down of the sun we feasted our fill on meat and wine,but when the sun went down and it came on dark the men laid themselvesdown to sleep in the covered cloisters. I, however, after I had gotinto bed with Circe, besought her by her knees, and the goddesslistened to what I had got to say. 'Circe,' said I, 'please to keepthe promise you made me about furthering me on my homeward voyage. Iwant to get back and so do my men, they are always pestering me withtheir complaints as soon as ever your back is turned.'
5.  "My friends, this man will give us no quarter. He will stand wherehe is and shoot us down till he has killed every man among us. Letus then show fight; draw your swords, and hold up the tables to shieldyou from his arrows. Let us have at him with a rush, to drive him fromthe pavement and doorway: we can then get through into the town, andraise such an alarm as shall soon stay his shooting."
6.  Eumaeus was frightened at the outcry they all raised, so he putthe bow down then and there, but Telemachus shouted out at him fromthe other side of the cloisters, and threatened him saying, "FatherEumaeus, bring the bow on in spite of them, or young as I am I willpelt you with stones back to the country, for I am the better man ofthe two. I wish I was as much stronger than all the other suitors inthe house as I am than you, I would soon send some of them off sickand sorry, for they mean mischief."

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1.  And Menelaus answered, "Telemachus, if you insist on going I willnot detain you. not like to see a host either too fond of his guest ortoo rude to him. Moderation is best in all things, and not letting aman go when he wants to do so is as bad as telling him to go if hewould like to stay. One should treat a guest well as long as he isin the house and speed him when he wants to leave it. Wait, then, tillI can get your beautiful presents into your chariot, and till you haveyourself seen them. I will tell the women to prepare a sufficientdinner for you of what there may be in the house; it will be at oncemore proper and cheaper for you to get your dinner before settingout on such a long journey. If, moreover, you have a fancy formaking a tour in Hellas or in the Peloponnese, I will yoke myhorses, and will conduct you myself through all our principalcities. No one will send us away empty handed; every one will giveus something- a bronze tripod, a couple of mules, or a gold cup."
2.  Phemius was still singing, and his hearers sat rapt in silence as hetold the sad tale of the return from Troy, and the ills Minerva hadlaid upon the Achaeans. Penelope, daughter of Icarius, heard hissong from her room upstairs, and came down by the great staircase, notalone, but attended by two of her handmaids. When she reached thesuitors she stood by one of the bearing posts that supported theroof of the cloisters with a staid maiden on either side of her. Sheheld a veil, moreover, before her face, and was weeping bitterly.
3.  But Neptune did not forget the threats with which he had alreadythreatened Ulysses, so he took counsel with Jove. "Father Jove,"said he, "I shall no longer be held in any sort of respect among yougods, if mortals like the Phaeacians, who are my own flesh andblood, show such small regard for me. I said I would Ulysses gethome when he had suffered sufficiently. I did not say that he shouldnever get home at all, for I knew you had already nodded your headabout it, and promised that he should do so; but now they have broughthim in a ship fast asleep and have landed him in Ithaca afterloading him with more magnificent presents of bronze, gold, andraiment than he would ever have brought back from Troy, if he hadhad his share of the spoil and got home without misadventure."
4.  On this the swineherd led the way into the hut and bade him sitdown. He strewed a good thick bed of rushes upon the floor, and on thetop of this he threw the shaggy chamois skin- a great thick one- onwhich he used to sleep by night. Ulysses was pleased at being madethus welcome, and said "May Jove, sir, and the rest of the godsgrant you your heart's desire in return for the kind way in whichyou have received me."
5.  "What do you mean, Telemachus," replied Antinous, "by thisswaggering talk? If all the suitors were to give him as much as Iwill, he would not come here again for another three months."
6.  When she had done speaking Eumaeus went back to the suitors, forhe had explained everything. Then he went up to Telemachus and said inhis ear so that none could overhear him, "My dear sir, I will now goback to the pigs, to see after your property and my own business.You will look to what is going on here, but above all be careful tokeep out of danger, for there are many who bear you ill will. May Jovebring them to a bad end before they do us a mischief."

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1.  And Menelaus answered, "Telemachus, if you insist on going I willnot detain you. not like to see a host either too fond of his guest ortoo rude to him. Moderation is best in all things, and not letting aman go when he wants to do so is as bad as telling him to go if hewould like to stay. One should treat a guest well as long as he isin the house and speed him when he wants to leave it. Wait, then, tillI can get your beautiful presents into your chariot, and till you haveyourself seen them. I will tell the women to prepare a sufficientdinner for you of what there may be in the house; it will be at oncemore proper and cheaper for you to get your dinner before settingout on such a long journey. If, moreover, you have a fancy formaking a tour in Hellas or in the Peloponnese, I will yoke myhorses, and will conduct you myself through all our principalcities. No one will send us away empty handed; every one will giveus something- a bronze tripod, a couple of mules, or a gold cup."
2.  "I will say what I think will be best," answered Ulysses. "Firstwash and put your shirts on; tell the maids also to go to their ownroom and dress; Phemius shall then strike up a dance tune on his lyre,so that if people outside hear, or any of the neighbours, or someone going along the street happens to notice it, they may thinkthere is a wedding in the house, and no rumours about the death of thesuitors will get about in the town, before we can escape to thewoods upon my own land. Once there, we will settle which of thecourses heaven vouchsafes us shall seem wisest."
3.  Then Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, itserved Aegisthus right, and so it would any one else who does as hedid; but Aegisthus is neither here nor there; it is for Ulysses thatmy heart bleeds, when I think of his sufferings in that lonelysea-girt island, far away, poor man, from all his friends. It is anisland covered with forest, in the very middle of the sea, and agoddess lives there, daughter of the magician Atlas, who looks afterthe bottom of the ocean, and carries the great columns that keepheaven and earth asunder. This daughter of Atlas has got hold ofpoor unhappy Ulysses, and keeps trying by every kind of blandishmentto make him forget his home, so that he is tired of life, and thinksof nothing but how he may once more see the smoke of his own chimneys.You, sir, take no heed of this, and yet when Ulysses was before Troydid he not propitiate you with many a burnt sacrifice? Why then shouldyou keep on being so angry with him?"
4.  Then Ulysses answered, "Madam wife of Ulysses, you need not deferyour tournament, for Ulysses will return ere ever they can stringthe bow, handle it how they will, and send their arrows through theiron."
5.   On this he began chopping firewood, while the others brought in afine fat five year old boar pig, and set it at the altar. Eumaeusdid not forget the gods, for he was a man of good principles, so thefirst thing he did was to cut bristles from the pig's face and throwthem into the fire, praying to all the gods as he did so thatUlysses might return home again. Then he clubbed the pig with a billetof oak which he had kept back when he was chopping the firewood, andstunned it, while the others slaughtered and singed it. Then theycut it up, and Eumaeus began by putting raw pieces from each jointon to some of the fat; these he sprinkled with barley meal, and laidupon the embers; they cut the rest of the meat up small, put thepieces upon the spits and roasted them till they were done; whenthey had taken them off the spits they threw them on to the dresser ina heap. The swineherd, who was a most equitable man, then stood upto give every one his share. He made seven portions; one of these heset apart for Mercury the son of Maia and the nymphs, praying tothem as he did so; the others he dealt out to the men man by man. Hegave Ulysses some slices cut lengthways down the loin as a mark ofespecial honour, and Ulysses was much pleased. "I hope, Eumaeus," saidhe, "that Jove will be as well disposed towards you as I am, for therespect you are showing to an outcast like myself."
6.  "Then, when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared, Isent some men to Circe's house to fetch the body of Elpenor. We cutfirewood from a wood where the headland jutted out into the sea, andafter we had wept over him and lamented him we performed his funeralrites. When his body and armour had been burned to ashes, we raiseda cairn, set a stone over it, and at the top of the cairn we fixed theoar that he had been used to row with.

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1.  The foot races came first. The course was set out for them fromthe starting post, and they raised a dust upon the plain as they allflew forward at the same moment. Clytoneus came in first by a longway; he left every one else behind him by the length of the furrowthat a couple of mules can plough in a fallow field. They thenturned to the painful art of wrestling, and here Euryalus proved to bethe best man. Amphialus excelled all the others in jumping, while atthrowing the disc there was no one who could approach Elatreus.Alcinous's son Laodamas was the best boxer, and he it was whopresently said, when they had all been diverted with the games, "Letus ask the stranger whether he excels in any of these sports; he seemsvery powerfully built; his thighs, claves, hands, and neck are ofprodigious strength, nor is he at all old, but he has suffered muchlately, and there is nothing like the sea for making havoc with a man,no matter how strong he is."
2.  As she spoke she drew a table loaded with ambrosia beside him andmixed him some red nectar, so Mercury ate and drank till he had hadenough, and then said:
3.  ULYSSES was left in the cloister, pondering on the means wherebywith Minerva's help he might be able to kill the suitors. Presently hesaid to Telemachus, "Telemachus, we must get the armour together andtake it down inside. Make some excuse when the suitors ask you why youhave removed it. Say that you have taken it to be out of the way ofthe smoke, inasmuch as it is no longer what it was when Ulysses wentaway, but has become soiled and begrimed with soot. Add to this moreparticularly that you are afraid Jove may set them on to quarrelover their wine, and that they may do each other some harm which maydisgrace both banquet and wooing, for the sight of arms sometimestempts people to use them."
4、  "Alas! I shall either be always feeble and of no prowess, or I amtoo young, and have not yet reached my full strength so as to beable to hold my own if any one attacks me. You others, therefore,who are stronger than I, make trial of the bow and get this contestsettled."
5、  "I will tell you the truth, my son," replied Ulysses. "It was thePhaeacians who brought me here. They are great sailors, and are in thehabit of giving escorts to any one who reaches their coasts. They tookme over the sea while I was fast asleep, and landed me in Ithaca,after giving me many presents in bronze, gold, and raiment. Thesethings by heaven's mercy are lying concealed in a cave, and I am nowcome here on the suggestion of Minerva that we may consult aboutkilling our enemies. First, therefore, give me a list of thesuitors, with their number, that I may learn who, and how many, theyare. I can then turn the matter over in my mind, and see whether wetwo can fight the whole body of them ourselves, or whether we mustfind others to help us."

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  • 金亨烈 08-04

      But all the time he felt sure it was Minerva, and the suitors fromthe other side raised an uproar when they saw her. Agelaus was thefirst to reproach her. "Mentor," he cried, "do not let Ulysses beguileyou into siding with him and fighting the suitors. This is what wewill do: when we have killed these people, father and son, we willkill you too. You shall pay for it with your head, and when we havekilled you, we will take all you have, in doors or out, and bring itinto hotch-pot with Ulysses' property; we will not let your sonslive in your house, nor your daughters, nor shall your widowcontinue to live in the city of Ithaca."

  • 张天鸿 08-04

      She said this to try him, but Ulysses was very angry and said,"Wife, I am much displeased at what you have just been saying. Who hasbeen taking my bed from the place in which I left it? He must havefound it a hard task, no matter how skilled a workman he was, unlesssome god came and helped him to shift it. There is no man living,however strong and in his prime, who could move it from its place, forit is a marvellous curiosity which I made with my very own hands.There was a young olive growing within the precincts of the house,in full vigour, and about as thick as a bearing-post. I built myroom round this with strong walls of stone and a roof to cover them,and I made the doors strong and well-fitting. Then I cut off the topboughs of the olive tree and left the stump standing. This I dressedroughly from the root upwards and then worked with carpenter's toolswell and skilfully, straightening my work by drawing a line on thewood, and making it into a bed-prop. I then bored a hole down themiddle, and made it the centre-post of my bed, at which I workedtill I had finished it, inlaying it with gold and silver; after this Istretched a hide of crimson leather from one side of it to theother. So you see I know all about it, and I desire to learn whetherit is still there, or whether any one has been removing it bycutting down the olive tree at its roots."

  • 景枫 08-04

       He then took off his armour and gave it to Eumaeus and Philoetius,who went straight on to the house, while he turned off into thevineyard to make trial of his father. As he went down into the greatorchard, he did not see Dolius, nor any of his sons nor of the otherbondsmen, for they were all gathering thorns to make a fence for thevineyard, at the place where the old man had told them; he thereforefound his father alone, hoeing a vine. He had on a dirty old shirt,patched and very shabby; his legs were bound round with thongs ofoxhide to save him from the brambles, and he also wore sleeves ofleather; he had a goat skin cap on his head, and was looking verywoe-begone. When Ulysses saw him so worn, so old and full of sorrow,he stood still under a tall pear tree and began to weep. He doubtedwhether to embrace him, kiss him, and tell him all about his havingcome home, or whether he should first question him and see what hewould say. In the end he deemed it best to be crafty with him, so inthis mind he went up to his father, who was bending down and diggingabout a plant.

  • 高发频 08-04

      "Then I took my sword of bronze and slung it over my shoulders; Ialso took my bow, and told Eurylochus to come back with me and show methe way. But he laid hold of me with both his hands and spokepiteously, saying, 'Sir, do not force me to go with you, but let mestay here, for I know you will not bring one of them back with you,nor even return alive yourself; let us rather see if we cannotescape at any rate with the few that are left us, for we may stillsave our lives.'

  • 崔大林 08-03

    {  On this the gods gathered to the house of Vulcan. Earth-encirclingNeptune came, and Mercury the bringer of luck, and King Apollo, butthe goddesses stayed at home all of them for shame. Then the givers ofall good things stood in the doorway, and the blessed gods roared withinextinguishable laughter, as they saw how cunning Vulcan had been,whereon one would turn towards his neighbour saying:

  • 钱易 08-02

      "My mother," answered Telemachus, tells me I am son to Ulysses,but it is a wise child that knows his own father. Would that I wereson to one who had grown old upon his own estates, for, since youask me, there is no more ill-starred man under heaven than he who theytell me is my father."}

  • 张承绪 08-02

      "Alas," he cried to himself in his dismay, "what ever will become ofme, and how is it all to end? If I stay here upon the river bedthrough the long watches of the night, I am so exhausted that thebitter cold and damp may make an end of me- for towards sunrisethere will be a keen wind blowing from off the river. If, on the otherhand, I climb the hill side, find shelter in the woods, and sleep insome thicket, I may escape the cold and have a good night's rest,but some savage beast may take advantage of me and devour me."

  • 陈林尔 08-02

      Then Penelope came down from her room looking like Venus or Diana,and they set her a seat inlaid with scrolls of silver and ivory nearthe fire in her accustomed place. It had been made by Icmalius and hada footstool all in one piece with the seat itself; and it wascovered with a thick fleece: on this she now sat, and the maids camefrom the women's room to join her. They set about removing thetables at which the wicked suitors had been dining, and took awaythe bread that was left, with the cups from which they had drunk. Theyemptied the embers out of the braziers, and heaped much wood upon themto give both light and heat; but Melantho began to rail at Ulysses asecond time and said, "Stranger, do you mean to plague us by hangingabout the house all night and spying upon the women? Be off, youwretch, outside, and eat your supper there, or you shall be driven outwith a firebrand."

  • 汤姆 08-01

       To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Old man, you willneither get paid for bringing good news, nor will Ulysses ever comehome; drink you wine in peace, and let us talk about something else.Do not keep on reminding me of all this; it always pains me when anyone speaks about my honoured master. As for your oath we will let italone, but I only wish he may come, as do Penelope, his old fatherLaertes, and his son Telemachus. I am terribly unhappy too aboutthis same boy of his; he was running up fast into manhood, and badefare to be no worse man, face and figure, than his father, but someone, either god or man, has been unsettling his mind, so he has goneoff to Pylos to try and get news of his father, and the suitors arelying in wait for him as he is coming home, in the hope of leaving thehouse of Arceisius without a name in Ithaca. But let us say no moreabout him, and leave him to be taken, or else to escape if the sonof Saturn holds his hand over him to protect him. And now, old man,tell me your own story; tell me also, for I want to know, who youare and where you come from. Tell me of your town and parents, whatmanner of ship you came in, how crew brought you to Ithaca, and fromwhat country they professed to come- for you cannot have come byland."

  • 詹姆斯·贝克 07-30

    {  The swineherd was very much disturbed when he heard this. "Heavenhelp me," he exclaimed, "what ever can have put such a notion asthat into your head? If you go near the suitors you will be undoneto a certainty, for their pride and insolence reach the veryheavens. They would never think of taking a man like you for aservant. Their servants are all young men, well dressed, wearinggood cloaks and shirts, with well looking faces and their hairalways tidy, the tables are kept quite clean and are loaded withbread, meat, and wine. Stay where you are, then; you are not inanybody's way; I do not mind your being here, no more do any of theothers, and when Telemachus comes home he will give you a shirt andcloak and will send you wherever you want to go."

  • 冯维静 07-30

      "I will tell you truly," answered Nestor, "and indeed you haveyourself divined how it all happened. If Menelaus when he got backfrom Troy had found Aegisthus still alive in his house, there wouldhave been no barrow heaped up for him, not even when he was dead,but he would have been thrown outside the city to dogs and vultures,and not a woman would have mourned him, for he had done a deed ofgreat wickedness; but we were over there, fighting hard at Troy, andAegisthus who was taking his ease quietly in the heart of Argos,cajoled Agamemnon's wife Clytemnestra with incessant flattery.

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