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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:隋咏良 大小:A5G3gO3B59510KB 下载:vtOIj4mO44831次
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日期:2020-08-06 13:13:01
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  SO HERE Ulysses slept, overcome by sleep and toil; but Minervawent off to the country and city of the Phaecians- a people who usedto live in the fair town of Hypereia, near the lawless Cyclopes. Nowthe Cyclopes were stronger than they and plundered them, so their kingNausithous moved them thence and settled them in Scheria, far from allother people. He surrounded the city with a wall, built houses andtemples, and divided the lands among his people; but he was dead andgone to the house of Hades, and King Alcinous, whose counsels wereinspired of heaven, was now reigning. To his house, then, didMinerva hie in furtherance of the return of Ulysses.
2.  Telemachus was the first to speak. "So you have got back,Eumaeus," said he. "What is the news of the town? Have the suitorsreturned, or are they still waiting over yonder, to take me on myway home?"
3.  "Meanwhile Lampetie went straight off to the sun and told him we hadbeen killing his cows, whereon he flew into a great rage, and saidto the immortals, 'Father Jove, and all you other gods who live ineverlasting bliss, I must have vengeance on the crew of Ulysses' ship:they have had the insolence to kill my cows, which were the onething I loved to look upon, whether I was going up heaven or downagain. If they do not square accounts with me about my cows, I will godown to Hades and shine there among the dead.'
4.  "So I drew back, and sheathed my sword, whereon when he had drank ofthe blood he began with his prophecy.
5.  "You are not my father, but some god is flattering me with vainhopes that I may grieve the more hereafter; no mortal man could ofhimself contrive to do as you have been doing, and make yourself oldand young at a moment's notice, unless a god were with him. A secondago you were old and all in rags, and now you are like some god comedown from heaven."
6.  Then turning to Ulysses he said, "Stranger, will you work as aservant, if I send you to the wolds and see that you are well paid?Can you build a stone fence, or plant trees? I will have you fed allthe year round, and will find you in shoes and clothing. Will yougo, then? Not you; for you have got into bad ways, and do not wantto work; you had rather fill your belly by going round the countrybegging."

计划指导

1.  Pisistratus thought how he should do as he was asked, and in the endhe deemed it best to turn his horses towards the ship, and putMenelaus's beautiful presents of gold and raiment in the stern ofthe vessel. Then he said, "Go on board at once and tell your men to doso also before I can reach home to tell my father. I know howobstinate he is, and am sure he will not let you go; he will come downhere to fetch you, and he will not go back without you. But he will bevery angry."
2.  "She is still at the house," replied Eumaeus, "grieving and breakingher heart, and doing nothing but weep, both night and daycontinually."
3.  "'Is there no way,' said I, 'of escaping Charybdis, and at thesame time keeping Scylla off when she is trying to harm my men?'
4.  Then spoke the aged hero Echeneus who was one of the oldest menamong them, "My friends," said he, "what our august queen has justsaid to us is both reasonable and to the purpose, therefore bepersuaded by it; but the decision whether in word or deed restsultimately with King Alcinous."
5.  When Euryclea heard this she began to cry, and spoke fondly tohim, saying, "My dear child, what ever can have put such notion asthat into your head? Where in the world do you want to go to- you, whoare the one hope of the house? Your poor father is dead and gone insome foreign country nobody knows where, and as soon as your back isturned these wicked ones here will be scheming to get you put out ofthe way, and will share all your possessions among themselves; staywhere you are among your own people, and do not go wandering andworrying your life out on the barren ocean."
6.  As he spoke he drew his rags aside from the great scar, and whenthey had examined it thoroughly, they both of them wept about Ulysses,threw their arms round him and kissed his head and shoulders, whileUlysses kissed their hands and faces in return. The sun would havegone down upon their mourning if Ulysses had not checked them andsaid:

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1.  "When I had nearly got back to the ship some god took pity upon mysolitude, and sent a fine antlered stag right into the middle of mypath. He was coming down his pasture in the forest to drink of theriver, for the heat of the sun drove him, and as he passed I struckhim in the middle of the back; the bronze point of the spear wentclean through him, and he lay groaning in the dust until the life wentout of him. Then I set my foot upon him, drew my spear from the wound,and laid it down; I also gathered rough grass and rushes and twistedthem into a fathom or so of good stout rope, with which I bound thefour feet of the noble creature together; having so done I hung himround my neck and walked back to the ship leaning upon my spear, forthe stag was much too big for me to be able to carry him on myshoulder, steadying him with one hand. As I threw him down in front ofthe ship, I called the men and spoke cheeringly man by man to eachof them. 'Look here my friends,' said I, 'we are not going to die somuch before our time after all, and at any rate we will not starveso long as we have got something to eat and drink on board.' On thisthey uncovered their heads upon the sea shore and admired the stag,for he was indeed a splendid fellow. Then, when they had feasted theireyes upon him sufficiently, they washed their hands and began tocook him for dinner.
2.  "'My good ram, what is it that makes you the last to leave my cavethis morning? You are not wont to let the ewes go before you, but leadthe mob with a run whether to flowery mead or bubbling fountain, andare the first to come home again at night; but now you lag last ofall. Is it because you know your master has lost his eye, and aresorry because that wicked Noman and his horrid crew have got himdown in his drink and blinded him? But I will have his life yet. Ifyou could understand and talk, you would tell me where the wretch ishiding, and I would dash his brains upon the ground till they flew allover the cave. I should thus have some satisfaction for the harm athis no-good Noman has done me.'
3.  "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, so you would start home to yourown land at once? Good luck go with you, but if you could only knowhow much suffering is in store for you before you get back to your owncountry, you would stay where you are, keep house along with me, andlet me make you immortal, no matter how anxious you may be to see thiswife of yours, of whom you are thinking all the time day after day;yet I flatter myself that at am no whit less tall or well-looking thanshe is, for it is not to be expected that a mortal woman shouldcompare in beauty with an immortal."
4.  Then the god stayed his stream and stilled the waves, making allcalm before him, and bringing him safely into the mouth of theriver. Here at last Ulysses' knees and strong hands failed him, forthe sea had completely broken him. His body was all swollen, and hismouth and nostrils ran down like a river with sea-water, so that hecould neither breathe nor speak, and lay swooning from sheerexhaustion; presently, when he had got his breath and came tohimself again, he took off the scarf that Ino had given him andthrew it back into the salt stream of the river, whereon Inoreceived it into her hands from the wave that bore it towards her.Then he left the river, laid himself down among the rushes, and kissedthe bounteous earth.
5.   Then the god stayed his stream and stilled the waves, making allcalm before him, and bringing him safely into the mouth of theriver. Here at last Ulysses' knees and strong hands failed him, forthe sea had completely broken him. His body was all swollen, and hismouth and nostrils ran down like a river with sea-water, so that hecould neither breathe nor speak, and lay swooning from sheerexhaustion; presently, when he had got his breath and came tohimself again, he took off the scarf that Ino had given him andthrew it back into the salt stream of the river, whereon Inoreceived it into her hands from the wave that bore it towards her.Then he left the river, laid himself down among the rushes, and kissedthe bounteous earth.
6.  BOOK VII.

应用

1.  "As he spoke he pulled the herb out of the ground an showed mewhat it was like. The root was black, while the flower was as white asmilk; the gods call it Moly, and mortal men cannot uproot it, butthe gods can do whatever they like.
2.  When Euryclea heard this she began to cry, and spoke fondly tohim, saying, "My dear child, what ever can have put such notion asthat into your head? Where in the world do you want to go to- you, whoare the one hope of the house? Your poor father is dead and gone insome foreign country nobody knows where, and as soon as your back isturned these wicked ones here will be scheming to get you put out ofthe way, and will share all your possessions among themselves; staywhere you are among your own people, and do not go wandering andworrying your life out on the barren ocean."
3.  BOOK XIV.
4、  When Eumaeus heard this he went straight to Ulysses and said,"Father stranger, my mistress Penelope, mother of Telemachus, has sentfor you; she is in great grief, but she wishes to hear anything youcan tell her about her husband, and if she is satisfied that you arespeaking the truth, she will give you a shirt and cloak, which are thevery things that you are most in want of. As for bread, you can getenough of that to fill your belly, by begging about the town, andletting those give that will."
5、  "If you are Ulysses," said he, "then what you have said is just.We have done much wrong on your lands and in your house. ButAntinous who was the head and front of the offending lies low already.It was all his doing. It was not that he wanted to marry Penelope;he did not so much care about that; what he wanted was something quitedifferent, and Jove has not vouchsafed it to him; he wanted to killyour son and to be chief man in Ithaca. Now, therefore, that he hasmet the death which was his due, spare the lives of your people. Wewill make everything good among ourselves, and pay you in full for allthat we have eaten and drunk. Each one of us shall pay you a fineworth twenty oxen, and we will keep on giving you gold and bronze tillyour heart is softened. Until we have done this no one can complain ofyour being enraged against us."

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  • 何金良 08-05

      Now when Penelope heard that the beggar had been struck in thebanqueting-cloister, she said before her maids, "Would that Apollowould so strike you, Antinous," and her waiting woman Eurynomeanswered, "If our prayers were answered not one of the suitors wouldever again see the sun rise." Then Penelope said, "Nurse, I hate everysingle one of them, for they mean nothing but mischief, but I hateAntinous like the darkness of death itself. A poor unfortunate tramphas come begging about the house for sheer want. Every one else hasgiven him something to put in his wallet, but Antinous has hit himon the right shoulder-blade with a footstool."

  • 胡锦涛 08-05

      In four days he had completed the whole work, and on the fifthCalypso sent him from the island after washing him and giving him someclean clothes. She gave him a goat skin full of black wine, andanother larger one of water; she also gave him a wallet full ofprovisions, and found him in much good meat. Moreover, she made thewind fair and warm for him, and gladly did Ulysses spread his sailbefore it, while he sat and guided the raft skilfully by means ofthe rudder. He never closed his eyes, but kept them fixed on thePleiads, on late-setting Bootes, and on the Bear- which men alsocall the wain, and which turns round and round where it is, facingOrion, and alone never dipping into the stream of Oceanus- for Calypsohad told him to keep this to his left. Days seven and ten did hesail over the sea, and on the eighteenth the dim outlines of themountains on the nearest part of the Phaeacian coast appeared,rising like a shield on the horizon.

  • 钟阜 08-05

       "Eumaeus, I hear footsteps; I suppose one of your men or some one ofyour acquaintance is coming here, for the dogs are fawning urn him andnot barking."

  • 里维埃拉 08-05

      "Men of Ithaca, it is all your own fault that things have turned outas they have; you would not listen to me, nor yet to Mentor, when webade you check the folly of your sons who were doing much wrong in thewantonness of their hearts- wasting the substance and dishonouring thewife of a chieftain who they thought would not return. Now, however,let it be as I say, and do as I tell you. Do not go out againstUlysses, or you may find that you have been drawing down evil onyour own heads."

  • 艾希提诺 08-04

    {  "When I saw him I tried to pacify him and said, 'Ajax, will younot forget and forgive even in death, but must the judgement aboutthat hateful armour still rankle with you? It cost us Argives dearenough to lose such a tower of strength as you were to us. Wemourned you as much as we mourned Achilles son of Peleus himself,nor can the blame be laid on anything but on the spite which Jove boreagainst the Danaans, for it was this that made him counsel yourdestruction- come hither, therefore, bring your proud spirit intosubjection, and hear what I can tell you.'

  • 李雪峰 08-03

      "When I had got the men together I said to them, 'You think youare about to start home again, but Circe has explained to me thatinstead of this, we have got to go to the house of Hades andProserpine to consult the ghost of the Theban prophet Teiresias.'}

  • 韦家明 08-03

      Then Ulysses answered, "Madam, wife of Ulysses, do not disfigureyourself further by grieving thus bitterly for your loss, though I canhardly blame you for doing so. A woman who has loved her husband andborne him children, would naturally be grieved at losing him, eventhough he were a worse man than Ulysses, who they say was like agod. Still, cease your tears and listen to what I can tell I will hidenothing from you, and can say with perfect truth that I have latelyheard of Ulysses as being alive and on his way home; he is among theThesprotians, and is bringing back much valuable treasure that hehas begged from one and another of them; but his ship and all his crewwere lost as they were leaving the Thrinacian island, for Jove and thesun-god were angry with him because his men had slaughtered thesun-god's cattle, and they were all drowned to a man. But Ulyssesstuck to the keel of the ship and was drifted on to the land of thePhaecians, who are near of kin to the immortals, and who treated himas though he had been a god, giving him many presents, and wishingto escort him home safe and sound. In fact Ulysses would have beenhere long ago, had he not thought better to go from land to landgathering wealth; for there is no man living who is so wily as heis; there is no one can compare with him. Pheidon king of theThesprotians told me all this, and he swore to me- makingdrink-offerings in his house as he did so- that the ship was by thewater side and the crew found who would take Ulysses to his owncountry. He sent me off first, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,but he showed me all treasure Ulysses had got together, and he hadenough lying in the house of king Pheidon to keep his family for tengenerations; but the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the high oak tree, and know whether afterso long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly or in secret.So you may know he is safe and will be here shortly; he is close athand and cannot remain away from home much longer; nevertheless I willconfirm my words with an oath, and call Jove who is the first andmightiest of all gods to witness, as also that hearth of Ulysses towhich I have now come, that all I have spoken shall surely come topass. Ulysses will return in this self same year; with the end of thismoon and the beginning of the next he will be here."

  • 甘国田 08-03

      On this he gave his orders to the servants, who got the waggonout, harnessed the mules, and put them to, while the girl broughtthe clothes down from the linen room and placed them on the waggon.Her mother prepared her a basket of provisions with all sorts ofgood things, and a goat skin full of wine; the girl now got into thewaggon, and her mother gave her also a golden cruse of oil, that sheand her women might anoint themselves. Then she took the whip andreins and lashed the mules on, whereon they set off, and their hoofsclattered on the road. They pulled without flagging, and carried notonly Nausicaa and her wash of clothes, but the maids also who werewith her.

  • 陈敏尔 08-02

       "Then I saw Alcmena, the wife of Amphitryon, who also bore to Joveindomitable Hercules; and Megara who was daughter to great King Creon,and married the redoubtable son of Amphitryon.

  • 岳德亮 07-31

    {  While Ulysses was thus yielding himself to a very deep slumberthat eased the burden of his sorrows, his admirable wife awoke, andsitting up in her bed began to cry. When she had relieved herself byweeping she prayed to Diana saying, "Great Goddess Diana, daughterof Jove, drive an arrow into my heart and slay me; or let somewhirlwind snatch me up and bear me through paths of darkness till itdrop me into the mouths of overflowing Oceanus, as it did thedaughters of Pandareus. The daughters of Pandareus lost their fatherand mother, for the gods killed them, so they were left orphans. ButVenus took care of them, and fed them on cheese, honey, and sweetwine. Juno taught them to excel all women in beauty of form andunderstanding; Diana gave them an imposing presence, and Minervaendowed them with every kind of accomplishment; but one day when Venushad gone up to Olympus to see Jove about getting them married (forwell does he know both what shall happen and what not happen toevery one) the storm winds came and spirited them away to becomehandmaids to the dread Erinyes. Even so I wish that the gods wholive in heaven would hide me from mortal sight, or that fair Dianamight strike me, for I would fain go even beneath the sad earth if Imight do so still looking towards Ulysses only, and without havingto yield myself to a worse man than he was. Besides, no matter howmuch people may grieve by day, they can put up with it so long as theycan sleep at night, for when the eyes are closed in slumber peopleforget good and ill alike; whereas my misery haunts me even in mydreams. This very night methought there was one lying by my side whowas like Ulysses as he was when he went away with his host, and Irejoiced, for I believed that it was no dream, but the very truthitself."

  • 程峰 07-31

      "Hear me," he cried, "daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, unweariable,hear me now, for you gave no heed to my prayers when Neptune waswrecking me. Now, therefore, have pity upon me and grant that I mayfind friends and be hospitably received by the Phaecians."

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