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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:赵庆华 大小:1YvRTnNa87997KB 下载:gbFGG9QM19641次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:PSWEC87m46596条
日期:2020-08-05 21:42:40
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吴哲彦

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Thus sang the bard, and both Ulysses and the seafaring Phaeacianswere charmed as they heard him.
2.  "I know, Eurynome," replied Penelope, "that you mean well, but donot try and persuade me to wash and to anoint myself, for heavenrobbed me of all my beauty on the day my husband sailed; nevertheless,tell Autonoe and Hippodamia that I want them. They must be with mewhen I am in the cloister; I am not going among the men alone; itwould not be proper for me to do so."
3.  "Then, being much troubled in mind, I said to my men, 'My friends,it is not right that one or two of us alone should know the propheciesthat Circe has made me, I will therefore tell you about them, sothat whether we live or die we may do so with our eyes open. First shesaid we were to keep clear of the Sirens, who sit and sing mostbeautifully in a field of flowers; but she said I might hear themmyself so long as no one else did. Therefore, take me and bind me tothe crosspiece half way up the mast; bind me as I stand upright,with a bond so fast that I cannot possibly break away, and lash therope's ends to the mast itself. If I beg and pray you to set mefree, then bind me more tightly still.'
4.  When the pair had thus laid their plans they parted, and the goddesswent straight to Lacedaemon to fetch Telemachus.
5.  Telemachus purposely made Ulysses sit in the part of the cloisterthat was paved with stone; he gave him a shabby-looking seat at alittle table to himself, and had his portion of the inward meatsbrought to him, with his wine in a gold cup. "Sit there," said he,"and drink your wine among the great people. I will put a stop tothe gibes and blows of the suitors, for this is no public house, butbelongs to Ulysses, and has passed from him to me. Therefore, suitors,keep your hands and your tongues to yourselves, or there will bemischief."
6.  And Ulysses answered, "I understand and heed. Go in first andleave me here where I am. I am quite used to being beaten and havingthings thrown at me. I have been so much buffeted about in war andby sea that I am case-hardened, and this too may go with the rest. Buta man cannot hide away the cravings of a hungry belly; this is anenemy which gives much trouble to all men; it is because of thisthat ships are fitted out to sail the seas, and to make war upon otherpeople."

计划指导

1.  As she spoke she touched him with her golden wand. First she threw afair clean shirt and cloak about his shoulders; then she made himyounger and of more imposing presence; she gave him back his colour,filled out his cheeks, and let his beard become dark again. Then shewent away and Ulysses came back inside the hut. His son wasastounded when he saw him, and turned his eyes away for fear hemight be looking upon a god.
2.  "Mentor," answered Telemachus, "do not let us talk about it anymore. There is no chance of my father's ever coming back; the godshave long since counselled his destruction. There is something else,however, about which I should like to ask Nestor, for he knows muchmore than any one else does. They say he has reigned for threegenerations so that it is like talking to an immortal. Tell me,therefore, Nestor, and tell me true; how did Agamemnon come to diein that way? What was Menelaus doing? And how came false Aegisthusto kill so far better a man than himself? Was Menelaus away fromAchaean Argos, voyaging elsewhither among mankind, that Aegisthus tookheart and killed Agamemnon?"
3.  "The queen is preparing for her marriage with one or other of us.Little does she dream that her son has now been doomed to die."
4.  Ulysses frowned on him and said, "My friend, I do you no manner ofharm; people give you a great deal, but I am not jealous. There isroom enough in this doorway for the pair of us, and you need notgrudge me things that are not yours to give. You seem to be justsuch another tramp as myself, but perhaps the gods will give us betterluck by and by. Do not, however, talk too much about fighting or youwill incense me, and old though I am, I shall cover your mouth andchest with blood. I shall have more peace to-morrow if I do, for youwill not come to the house of Ulysses any more."
5.  So Eteoneus bustled back and bade other servants come with him. Theytook their sweating hands from under the yoke, made them fast to themangers, and gave them a feed of oats and barley mixed. Then theyleaned the chariot against the end wall of the courtyard, and ledthe way into the house. Telemachus and Pisistratus were astonishedwhen they saw it, for its splendour was as that of the sun and moon;then, when they had admired everything to their heart's content,they went into the bath room and washed themselves.
6.  Thus did he speak, and they went on board even as he had said. Butas Telemachus was thus busied, praying also and sacrificing to Minervain the ship's stern, there came to him a man from a distant country, aseer, who was flying from Argos because he had killed a man. He wasdescended from Melampus, who used to live in Pylos, the land of sheep;he was rich and owned a great house, but he was driven into exile bythe great and powerful king Neleus. Neleus seized his goods and heldthem for a whole year, during which he was a close prisoner in thehouse of king Phylacus, and in much distress of mind both on accountof the daughter of Neleus and because he was haunted by a great sorrowthat dread Erinyes had laid upon him. In the end, however, heescaped with his life, drove the cattle from Phylace to Pylos, avengedthe wrong that had been done him, and gave the daughter of Neleus tohis brother. Then he left the country and went to Argos, where itwas ordained that he should reign over much people. There hemarried, established himself, and had two famous sons Antiphates andMantius. Antiphates became father of Oicleus, and Oicleus ofAmphiaraus, who was dearly loved both by Jove and by Apollo, but hedid not live to old age, for he was killed in Thebes by reason of awoman's gifts. His sons were Alcmaeon and Amphilochus. Mantius, theother son of Melampus, was father to Polypheides and Cleitus.Aurora, throned in gold, carried off Cleitus for his beauty's sake,that he might dwell among the immortals, but Apollo made Polypheidesthe greatest seer in the whole world now that Amphiaraus was dead.He quarrelled with his father and went to live in Hyperesia, wherehe remained and prophesied for all men.

推荐功能

1.  "I was told all this by Calypso, who said she had heard it fromthe mouth of Mercury.
2.  "'Say not a word,' he answered, 'in death's favour; I would ratherbe a paid servant in a poor man's house and be above ground thanking of kings among the dead. But give me news about son; is he goneto the wars and will he be a great soldier, or is this not so? Tell mealso if you have heard anything about my father Peleus- does hestill rule among the Myrmidons, or do they show him no respectthroughout Hellas and Phthia now that he is old and his limbs failhim? Could I but stand by his side, in the light of day, with the samestrength that I had when I killed the bravest of our foes upon theplain of Troy- could I but be as I then was and go even for a shorttime to my father's house, any one who tried to do him violence orsupersede him would soon me it.'
3.  With these words he took Theoclymenus to his own house. When theygot there they laid their cloaks on the benches and seats, went intothe baths, and washed themselves. When the maids had washed andanointed them, and had given them cloaks and shirts, they took theirseats at table. A maid servant then brought them water in abeautiful golden ewer, and poured it into a silver basin for them towash their hands; and she drew a clean table beside them. An upperservant brought them bread and offered them many good things of whatthere was in the house. Opposite them sat Penelope, reclining on acouch by one of the bearing-posts of the cloister, and spinning.Then they laid their hands on the good things that were before them,and as soon as they had had enough to eat and drink Penelope said:
4.  And Ulysses answered, "In good truth, goddess, it seems I shouldhave come to much the same bad end in my own house as Agamemnon did,if you had not given me such timely information. Advise me how I shallbest avenge myself. Stand by my side and put your courage into myheart as on the day when we loosed Troy's fair diadem from her brow.Help me now as you did then, and I will fight three hundred men, ifyou, goddess, will be with me."
5.   "Telemachus," said she, addressing her son, "I fear you are nolonger so discreet and well conducted as you used to be. When you wereyounger you had a greater sense of propriety; now, however, that youare grown up, though a stranger to look at you would take you forthe son of a well-to-do father as far as size and good looks go,your conduct is by no means what it should be. What is all thisdisturbance that has been going on, and how came you to allow astranger to be so disgracefully ill-treated? What would havehappened if he had suffered serious injury while a suppliant in ourhouse? Surely this would have been very discreditable to you."
6.  "Nausicaa, what can your mother have been about, to have such a lazydaughter? Here are your clothes all lying in disorder, yet you aregoing to be married almost immediately, and should not only be welldressed yourself, but should find good clothes for those who attendyou. This is the way to get yourself a good name, and to make yourfather and mother proud of you. Suppose, then, that we make tomorrow awashing day, and start at daybreak. I will come and help you so thatyou may have everything ready as soon as possible, for all the bestyoung men among your own people are courting you, and you are notgoing to remain a maid much longer. Ask your father, therefore, tohave a waggon and mules ready for us at daybreak, to take the rugs,robes, and girdles; and you can ride, too, which will be muchpleasanter for you than walking, for the washing-cisterns are some wayfrom the town."

应用

1.  "Hear me, men of Ithaca, and I speak more particularly to thesuitors, for I see mischief brewing for them. Ulysses is not goingto be away much longer; indeed he is close at hand to deal out deathand destruction, not on them alone, but on many another of us who livein Ithaca. Let us then be wise in time, and put a stop to thiswickedness before he comes. Let the suitors do so of their own accord;it will be better for them, for I am not prophesying without dueknowledge; everything has happened to Ulysses as I foretold when theArgives set out for Troy, and he with them. I said that after goingthrough much hardship and losing all his men he should come home againin the twentieth year and that no one would know him; and now all thisis coming true."
2.  "Leiodes, what are you talking about? Your words are monstrous andintolerable; it makes me angry to listen to you. Shall, then, this bowtake the life of many a chief among us, merely because you cannot bendit yourself? True, you were not born to be an archer, but there areothers who will soon string it."
3.  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tellyou the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been agreat traveller. At this moment he is running away from aThesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him intoyour hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he isyour suppliant."
4、  He began with his victory over the Cicons, and how he thence reachedthe fertile land of the Lotus-eaters. He told her all about theCyclops and how he had punished him for having so ruthlessly eaten hisbrave comrades; how he then went on to Aeolus, who received himhospitably and furthered him on his way, but even so he was not toreach home, for to his great grief a hurricane carried him out tosea again; how he went on to the Laestrygonian city Telepylos, wherethe people destroyed all his ships with their crews, save himselfand his own ship only. Then he told of cunning Circe and her craft,and how he sailed to the chill house of Hades, to consult the ghost ofthe Theban prophet Teiresias, and how he saw his old comrades in arms,and his mother who bore him and brought him up when he was a child;how he then heard the wondrous singing of the Sirens, and went on tothe wandering rocks and terrible Charybdis and to Scylla, whom noman had ever yet passed in safety; how his men then ate the cattleof the sun-god, and how Jove therefore struck the ship with histhunderbolts, so that all his men perished together, himself alonebeing left alive; how at last he reached the Ogygian island and thenymph Calypso, who kept him there in a cave, and fed him, and wantedhim to marry her, in which case she intended making him immortal sothat he should never grow old, but she could not persuade him to lether do so; and how after much suffering he had found his way to thePhaeacians, who had treated him as though he had been a god, andsent him back in a ship to his own country after having given himgold, bronze, and raiment in great abundance. This was the lastthing about which he told her, for here a deep sleep took hold uponhim and eased the burden of his sorrows.
5、  "I should have done so at once," replied Neptune, "if I were notanxious to avoid anything that might displease you; now, therefore,I should like to wreck the Phaecian ship as it is returning from itsescort. This will stop them from escorting people in future; and Ishould also like to bury their city under a huge mountain."

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网友评论(beTUqcev43408))

  • 刘凡 08-04

      "Thence we sailed sadly on, glad to have escaped death, though wehad lost our comrades, and came to the Aeaean island, where Circelives a great and cunning goddess who is own sister to the magicianAeetes- for they are both children of the sun by Perse, who isdaughter to Oceanus. We brought our ship into a safe harbour without aword, for some god guided us thither, and having landed we there fortwo days and two nights, worn out in body and mind. When the morningof the third day came I took my spear and my sword, and went away fromthe ship to reconnoitre, and see if I could discover signs of humanhandiwork, or hear the sound of voices. Climbing to the top of ahigh look-out I espied the smoke of Circe's house rising upwardsamid a dense forest of trees, and when I saw this I doubted whether,having seen the smoke, I would not go on at once and find out more,but in the end I deemed it best to go back to the ship, give the mentheir dinners, and send some of them instead of going myself.

  • 肖烨 08-04

      "Thus did she speak and we assented. We stayed with Circe for awhole twelvemonth feasting upon an untold quantity both of meat andwine. But when the year had passed in the waning of moons and the longdays had come round, my men called me apart and said, 'Sir, it is timeyou began to think about going home, if so be you are to be sparedto see your house and native country at all.'

  • 金建平 08-04

       Another said, "I hope he may be no more successful in other thingsthan he is likely to be in stringing this bow."

  • 王伟平 08-04

      NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Telemachus rose and dressed himself. He bound his sandals on to hiscomely feet, girded his sword about his shoulder, and left his roomlooking like an immortal god. He at once sent the criers round to callthe people in assembly, so they called them and the people gatheredthereon; then, when they were got together, he went to the place ofassembly spear in hand- not alone, for his two hounds went with him.Minerva endowed him with a presence of such divine comeliness that allmarvelled at him as he went by, and when he took his place' in hisfather's seat even the oldest councillors made way for him.

  • 史蒂文·迪克斯 08-03

    {  "When we reached the harbour we found it land-locked under steepcliffs, with a narrow entrance between two headlands. My captains tookall their ships inside, and made them fast close to one another, forthere was never so much as a breath of wind inside, but it wasalways dead calm. I kept my own ship outside, and moored it to arock at the very end of the point; then I climbed a high rock toreconnoitre, but could see no sign neither of man nor cattle, onlysome smoke rising from the ground. So I sent two of my company with anattendant to find out what sort of people the inhabitants were.

  • 李伯钊 08-02

      "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, it is now time for you to tellyour son: do not keep him in the dark any longer, but lay your plansfor the destruction of the suitors, and then make for the town. I willnot be long in joining you, for I too am eager for the fray."}

  • 胡珍珍 08-02

      He then chose twenty men, and they went down to their. ship and tothe sea side; they drew the vessel into the water and got her mast andsails inside her; they bound the oars to the thole-pins with twistedthongs of leather, all in due course, and spread the white sailsaloft, while their fine servants brought them their armour. Thenthey made the ship fast a little way out, came on shore again, gottheir suppers, and waited till night should fall.

  • 薛睿杰 08-02

      As he spoke he crossed the threshold, and Alcinous sent a man toconduct him to his ship and to the sea shore. Arete also sent somemaid servants with him- one with a clean shirt and cloak, another tocarry his strong-box, and a third with corn and wine. When they got tothe water side the crew took these things and put them on board,with all the meat and drink; but for Ulysses they spread a rug and alinen sheet on deck that he might sleep soundly in the stern of theship. Then he too went on board and lay down without a word, but thecrew took every man his place and loosed the hawser from the piercedstone to which it had been bound. Thereon, when they began rowingout to sea, Ulysses fell into a deep, sweet, and almost deathlikeslumber.

  • 唐应茂 08-01

       "The thing shall be done," exclaimed Alcinous, "as surely as I stilllive and reign over the Phaeacians. Our guest is indeed very anxiousto get home, still we must persuade him to remain with us untilto-morrow, by which time I shall be able to get together the whole sumthat I mean to give him. As regards- his escort it will be a matterfor you all, and mine above all others as the chief person among you."

  • 路金利 07-30

    {  To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "Poor unhappy stranger, Ihave found the story of your misfortunes extremely interesting, butthat part about Ulysses is not right; and you will never get me tobelieve it. Why should a man like you go about telling lies in thisway? I know all about the return of my master. The gods one and all ofthem detest him, or they would have taken him before Troy, or lethim die with friends around him when the days of his fighting weredone; for then the Achaeans would have built a mound over his ashesand his son would have been heir to his renown, but now the stormwinds have spirited him away we know not whither.

  • 桂维民 07-30

      "The first ghost 'that came was that of my comrade Elpenor, for hehad not yet been laid beneath the earth. We had left his bodyunwaked and unburied in Circe's house, for we had had too much else todo. I was very sorry for him, and cried when I saw him: 'Elpenor,'said I, 'how did you come down here into this gloom and darkness?You have here on foot quicker than I have with my ship.'

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