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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:邹雷 大小:rTF83QWm55793KB 下载:GebQ0Bbm18794次
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日期:2020-08-06 01:53:52
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  "Then,' he said, 'if you would finish your voyage and get homequickly, you must offer sacrifices to Jove and to the rest of the godsbefore embarking; for it is decreed that you shall not get back toyour friends, and to your own house, till you have returned to theheaven fed stream of Egypt, and offered holy hecatombs to the immortalgods that reign in heaven. When you have done this they will let youfinish your voyage.'
2.  "'Stay here, my brave fellows,' said I, 'all the rest of you,while I go with my ship and exploit these people myself: I want to seeif they are uncivilized savages, or a hospitable and humane race.'
3.  "My house grew apace and I became a great man among the Cretans, butwhen Jove counselled that terrible expedition, in which so manyperished, the people required me and Idomeneus to lead their shipsto Troy, and there was no way out of it, for they insisted on ourdoing so. There we fought for nine whole years, but in the tenth wesacked the city of Priam and sailed home again as heaven dispersed us.Then it was that Jove devised evil against me. I spent but one monthhappily with my children, wife, and property, and then I conceived theidea of making a descent on Egypt, so I fitted out a fine fleet andmanned it. I had nine ships, and the people flocked to fill them.For six days I and my men made feast, and I found them many victimsboth for sacrifice to the gods and for themselves, but on theseventh day we went on board and set sail from Crete with a fair Northwind behind us though we were going down a river. Nothing went illwith any of our ships, and we had no sickness on board, but satwhere we were and let the ships go as the wind and steersmen tookthem. On the fifth day we reached the river Aegyptus; there Istationed my ships in the river, bidding my men stay by them andkeep guard over them while I sent out scouts to reconnoitre from everypoint of vantage.
4.  Then the queen went back to her room upstairs, and her maids broughtthe presents after her. Meanwhile the suitors took to singing anddancing, and stayed till evening came. They danced and sang till itgrew dark; they then brought in three braziers to give light, andpiled them up with chopped firewood very and dry, and they lit torchesfrom them, which the maids held up turn and turn about. Then Ulyssessaid:
5.  Thereon he floated about for two nights and two days in the water,with a heavy swell on the sea and death staring him in the face; butwhen the third day broke, the wind fell and there was a dead calmwithout so much as a breath of air stirring. As he rose on the swellhe looked eagerly ahead, and could see land quite near. Then, aschildren rejoice when their dear father begins to get better afterhaving for a long time borne sore affliction sent him by some angryspirit, but the gods deliver him from evil, so was Ulysses thankfulwhen he again saw land and trees, and swam on with all his strengththat he might once more set foot upon dry ground. When, however, hegot within earshot, he began to hear the surf thundering up againstthe rocks, for the swell still broke against them with a terrificroar. Everything was enveloped in spray; there were no harbourswhere a ship might ride, nor shelter of any kind, but onlyheadlands, low-lying rocks, and mountain tops.
6.  They turned pale with fear as he spoke, and every man looked roundabout to see whither he might fly for safety, but Eurymachus alonespoke.

计划指导

1.  "You want to know,' said he, 'about your return home, but heavenwill make this hard for you. I do not think that you will escape theeye of Neptune, who still nurses his bitter grudge against you forhaving blinded his son. Still, after much suffering you may get homeif you can restrain yourself and your companions when your shipreaches the Thrinacian island, where you will find the sheep andcattle belonging to the sun, who sees and gives ear to everything.If you leave these flocks unharmed and think of nothing but of gettinghome, you may yet after much hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harmthem, then I forewarn you of the destruction both of your ship andof your men. Even though you may yourself escape, you will return inbad plight after losing all your men, [in another man's ship, andyou will find trouble in your house, which will be overrun byhigh-handed people, who are devouring your substance under the pretextof paying court and making presents to your wife.
2.  "Eurymachus," Penelope answered, "people who persist in eating upthe estate of a great chieftain and dishonouring his house must notexpect others to think well of them. Why then should you mind if mentalk as you think they will? This stranger is strong and well-built,he says moreover that he is of noble birth. Give him the bow, andlet us see whether he can string it or no. I say- and it shallsurely be- that if Apollo vouchsafes him the glory of stringing it,I will give him a cloak and shirt of good wear, with a javelin to keepoff dogs and robbers, and a sharp sword. I will also give him sandals,and will see him sent safely whereever he wants to go."
3.  With this he left them to come on at their leisure, while he wentquickly forward and soon reached the house of his master. When hegot there he went in and took his seat among the suitors oppositeEurymachus, who liked him better than any of the others. Theservants brought him a portion of meat, and an upper woman servant setbread before him that he might eat. Presently Ulysses and theswineherd came up to the house and stood by it, amid a sound of music,for Phemius was just beginning to sing to the suitors. Then Ulyssestook hold of the swineherd's hand, and said:
4.  BOOK V.
5.  He counted his goodly coppers and cauldrons, his gold and all hisclothes, but there was nothing missing; still he kept grieving aboutnot being in his own country, and wandered up and down by the shore ofthe sounding sea bewailing his hard fate. Then Minerva came up tohim disguised as a young shepherd of delicate and princely mien,with a good cloak folded double about her shoulders; she had sandalson her comely feet and held a javelin in her hand. Ulysses was gladwhen he saw her, and went straight up to her.
6.  Then they roasted the outer meat, drew it off the spits, gaveevery man his portion, and feasted to their hearts' content; those whowaited at table gave Ulysses exactly the same portion as the othershad, for Telemachus had told them to do so.

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1.  "Take heart, and do not trouble yourself about that," rejoinedMinerva, "let us rather set about stowing your things at once in thecave, where they will be quite safe. Let us see how we can best manageit all."
2.  BOOK XVI.
3.  As he spoke he sprang from his seat, threw his crimson cloak fromhim, and took his sword from his shoulder. First he set the axes ina row, in a long groove which he had dug for them, and had Wadestraight by line. Then he stamped the earth tight round them, andeveryone was surprised when they saw him set up so orderly, thoughhe had never seen anything of the kind before. This done, he went onto the pavement to make trial of the bow; thrice did he tug at it,trying with all his might to draw the string, and thrice he had toleave off, though he had hoped to string the bow and shoot through theiron. He was trying for the fourth time, and would have strung ithad not Ulysses made a sign to check him in spite of all hiseagerness. So he said:
4.  Then Ulysses said: "Pray, Alcinous, do not take any such notion intoyour head. I have nothing of the immortal about me, neither in bodynor mind, and most resemble those among you who are the mostafflicted. Indeed, were I to tell you all that heaven has seen fitto lay upon me, you would say that I was still worse off than theyare. Nevertheless, let me sup in spite of sorrow, for an empty stomachis a very importunate thing, and thrusts itself on a man's notice nomatter how dire is his distress. I am in great trouble, yet it insiststhat I shall eat and drink, bids me lay aside all memory of my sorrowsand dwell only on the due replenishing of itself. As for yourselves,do as you propose, and at break of day set about helping me to gethome. I shall be content to die if I may first once more behold myproperty, my bondsmen, and all the greatness of my house."
5.   "I should have done so at once," replied Neptune, "if I were notanxious to avoid anything that might displease you; now, therefore,I should like to wreck the Phaecian ship as it is returning from itsescort. This will stop them from escorting people in future; and Ishould also like to bury their city under a huge mountain."
6.  "Eumaeus, what a noble hound that is over yonder on the manure heap:his build is splendid; is he as fine a fellow as he looks, or is heonly one of those dogs that come begging about a table, and are keptmerely for show?"

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1.  THUS, then, did Ulysses wait and pray; but the girl drove on tothe town. When she reached her father's house she drew up at thegateway, and her brothers- comely as the gods- gathered round her,took the mules out of the waggon, and carried the clothes into thehouse, while she went to her own room, where an old servant,Eurymedusa of Apeira, lit the fire for her. This old woman had beenbrought by sea from Apeira, and had been chosen as a prize forAlcinous because he was king over the Phaecians, and the people obeyedhim as though he were a god. She had been nurse to Nausicaa, and hadnow lit the fire for her, and brought her supper for her into herown room.
2.  As he spoke he threw his shabby old tattered wallet over hisshoulders, by the cord from which it hung, and Eumaeus gave him astick to his liking. The two then started, leaving the station incharge of the dogs and herdsmen who remained behind; the swineherd ledthe way and his master followed after, looking like some broken-downold tramp as he leaned upon his staff, and his clothes were all inrags. When they had got over the rough steep ground and were nearingthe city, they reached the fountain from which the citizens drew theirwater. This had been made by Ithacus, Neritus, and Polyctor. There wasa grove of water-loving poplars planted in a circle all round it,and the clear cold water came down to it from a rock high up, whileabove the fountain there was an altar to the nymphs, at which allwayfarers used to sacrifice. Here Melanthius son of Dolius overtookthem as he was driving down some goats, the best in his flock, for thesuitors' dinner, and there were two shepherds with him. When he sawEumaeus and Ulysses he reviled them with outrageous and unseemlylanguage, which made Ulysses very angry.
3.  "As he spoke he pulled the herb out of the ground an showed mewhat it was like. The root was black, while the flower was as white asmilk; the gods call it Moly, and mortal men cannot uproot it, butthe gods can do whatever they like.
4、  Pontonous then mixed wine and water, and handed it round aftergiving every man his drink-offering. When they had made theirofferings, and had drunk each as much as he was minded, Alcinous said:
5、  "Vulcan," said Neptune, "if Mars goes away without paying hisdamages, I will pay you myself." So Vulcan answered, "In this case Icannot and must not refuse you."

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  • 亚历山德拉·罗伯森 08-05

      "I had hardly finished telling everything to the men before wereached the island of the two Sirens, for the wind had been veryfavourable. Then all of a sudden it fell dead calm; there was not abreath of wind nor a ripple upon the water, so the men furled thesails and stowed them; then taking to their oars they whitened thewater with the foam they raised in rowing. Meanwhile I look a largewheel of wax and cut it up small with my sword. Then I kneaded the waxin my strong hands till it became soft, which it soon did betweenthe kneading and the rays of the sun-god son of Hyperion. Then Istopped the ears of all my men, and they bound me hands and feet tothe mast as I stood upright on the crosspiece; but they went on rowingthemselves. When we had got within earshot of the land, and the shipwas going at a good rate, the Sirens saw that we were getting in shoreand began with their singing.

  • 白音 08-05

      Then Penelope came down from her room looking like Venus or Diana,and they set her a seat inlaid with scrolls of silver and ivory nearthe fire in her accustomed place. It had been made by Icmalius and hada footstool all in one piece with the seat itself; and it wascovered with a thick fleece: on this she now sat, and the maids camefrom the women's room to join her. They set about removing thetables at which the wicked suitors had been dining, and took awaythe bread that was left, with the cups from which they had drunk. Theyemptied the embers out of the braziers, and heaped much wood upon themto give both light and heat; but Melantho began to rail at Ulysses asecond time and said, "Stranger, do you mean to plague us by hangingabout the house all night and spying upon the women? Be off, youwretch, outside, and eat your supper there, or you shall be driven outwith a firebrand."

  • 鲁瓦尔卡瓦 08-05

       But all the time he felt sure it was Minerva, and the suitors fromthe other side raised an uproar when they saw her. Agelaus was thefirst to reproach her. "Mentor," he cried, "do not let Ulysses beguileyou into siding with him and fighting the suitors. This is what wewill do: when we have killed these people, father and son, we willkill you too. You shall pay for it with your head, and when we havekilled you, we will take all you have, in doors or out, and bring itinto hotch-pot with Ulysses' property; we will not let your sonslive in your house, nor your daughters, nor shall your widowcontinue to live in the city of Ithaca."

  • 吴川祝 08-05

      But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment cease theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become even more bitter againstthem; she therefore set Eurymachus son of Polybus on to gibe at him,which made the others laugh. "Listen to me," said he, "you suitorsof Queen Penelope, that I may speak even as I am minded. It is not fornothing that this man has come to the house of Ulysses; I believethe light has not been coming from the torches, but from his own head-for his hair is all gone, every bit of it."

  • 陈若星 08-04

    {  "On this we all went inland, and Eurylochus was not left behindafter all, but came on too, for he was frightened by the severereprimand that I had given him.

  • 吴温 08-03

      Thus did they converse. Meanwhile Eurynome and the nurse tooktorches and made the bed ready with soft coverlets; as soon as theyhad laid them, the nurse went back into the house to go to her rest,leaving the bed chamber woman Eurynome to show Ulysses and Penelope tobed by torch light. When she had conducted them to their room she wentback, and they then came joyfully to the rites of their own old bed.Telemachus, Philoetius, and the swineherd now left off dancing, andmade the women leave off also. They then laid themselves down to sleepin the cloisters.}

  • 梁君 08-03

      "'Come here,' they sang, 'renowned Ulysses, honour to the Achaeanname, and listen to our two voices. No one ever sailed past us withoutstaying to hear the enchanting sweetness of our song- and he wholistens will go on his way not only charmed, but wiser, for we knowall the ills that the gods laid upon the Argives and Trojans beforeTroy, and can tell you everything that is going to happen over thewhole world.'

  • 袁日进 08-03

      "Eumaeus, I hear footsteps; I suppose one of your men or some one ofyour acquaintance is coming here, for the dogs are fawning urn him andnot barking."

  • 徐洪灿 08-02

       "In the end I deemed it would be the best plan to do as follows. TheCyclops had a great club which was lying near one of the sheep pens;it was of green olive wood, and he had cut it intending to use itfor a staff as soon as it should be dry. It was so huge that wecould only compare it to the mast of a twenty-oared merchant vessel oflarge burden, and able to venture out into open sea. I went up to thisclub and cut off about six feet of it; I then gave this piece to themen and told them to fine it evenly off at one end, which theyproceeded to do, and lastly I brought it to a point myself, charringthe end in the fire to make it harder. When I had done this I hid itunder dung, which was lying about all over the cave, and told themen to cast lots which of them should venture along with myself tolift it and bore it into the monster's eye while he was asleep. Thelot fell upon the very four whom I should have chosen, and I myselfmade five. In the evening the wretch came back from shepherding, anddrove his flocks into the cave- this time driving them all inside, andnot leaving any in the yards; I suppose some fancy must have takenhim, or a god must have prompted him to do so. As soon as he had putthe stone back to its place against the door, he sat down, milkedhis ewes and his goats all quite rightly, and then let each have herown young one; when he had got through with all this work, hegripped up two more of my men, and made his supper off them. So I wentup to him with an ivy-wood bowl of black wine in my hands:

  • 腾迅 07-31

    {  On this pale fear seized every one; they were so frightened thattheir arms dropped from their hands and fell upon the ground at thesound of the goddess's voice, and they fled back to the city for theirlives. But Ulysses gave a great cry, and gathering himself togetherswooped down like a soaring eagle. Then the son of Saturn sent athunderbolt of fire that fell just in front of Minerva, so she said toUlysses, "Ulysses, noble son of Laertes, stop this warful strife, orJove will be angry with you."

  • 王东子 07-31

      "'I have heard nothing,' I answered, 'of Peleus, but I can tellyou all about your son Neoptolemus, for I took him in my own ship fromScyros with the Achaeans. In our councils of war before Troy he wasalways first to speak, and his judgement was unerring. Nestor and Iwere the only two who could surpass him; and when it came tofighting on the plain of Troy, he would never remain with the bodyof his men, but would dash on far in front, foremost of them all invalour. Many a man did he kill in battle- I cannot name every singleone of those whom he slew while fighting on the side of the Argives,but will only say how he killed that valiant hero Eurypylus son ofTelephus, who was the handsomest man I ever saw except Memnon; manyothers also of the Ceteians fell around him by reason of a woman'sbribes. Moreover, when all the bravest of the Argives went insidethe horse that Epeus had made, and it was left to me to settle when weshould either open the door of our ambuscade, or close it, thoughall the other leaders and chief men among the Danaans were dryingtheir eyes and quaking in every limb, I never once saw him turn palenor wipe a tear from his cheek; he was all the time urging me to breakout from the horse- grasping the handle of his sword and hisbronze-shod spear, and breathing fury against the foe. Yet when we hadsacked the city of Priam he got his handsome share of the prizemoney and went on board (such is the fortune of war) without a woundupon him, neither from a thrown spear nor in close combat, for therage of Mars is a matter of great chance.'

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